partition vs volume

Hi all,

I know there is a differnce between a partition and a volume, I read the
wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volume_(computing) but I am still not able
to get the difference quite.

Can some one please help be clarify…

Thanks

B

A partition splits a physical hard disk into to logical entities, each of
these benave as separate hard disks.
A volume is a section of storage, it can span across multiple partitions and
more importantly, across multiple physical hard drives.

All areas of the volume are accessible using a single file system, where as
each partition requires it’s own instance of a file system…

hope this helps

Amitrajit

On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 7:56 PM, Bedanto wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I know there is a differnce between a partition and a volume, I read the
> wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volume_(computing) but I am still not
> able to get the difference quite.
>
> Can some one please help be clarify…
>
> Thanks
>
> B
> — NTDEV is sponsored by OSR For our schedule of WDF, WDM, debugging and
> other seminars visit: http://www.osr.com/seminars To unsubscribe, visit
> the List Server section of OSR Online at
> http://www.osronline.com/page.cfm?name=ListServer



- amitr0

Hi Bedanto,

One way is to think that you can have a multi-partition volumes. That is a volume that can be comprised by several partitions on diferent disks.

Fernando Roberto da Silva
DriverEntry Kernel Development
http://www.driverentry.com.br/en

As you know, a PARTITION is a structure comprising logically contiguous sectors on a disk.

A VOLUME is a logical structure in which data is stored which may comprise one or more partitions. Consider a Volume that is striped or RAIDed. That Volume will span multiple physical partitions.

Of course, the simplest variation of a Volume is the “Basic Volume” in which the Volume is composed of just one partition.

Simple, right?

Peter
OSR

Amitrajit, Peter, Fernando,

Thanks for the answers. That cleared my doubts, but now I have more doubts
(little knowledge is becoming dangerous)

Assuming that I have two drives

/device/hdd1
/device/hdd2

each of these have one NTFS partition and were shown as two separate drives
(say C and D:)
Now there are ways to merge them and make one volume out of them. In that
case, what happens to the two separate partitions, are they merged
automatically? Or does one require specialized software to take care of it?

Also, once this is done, does this imply it is a RAID?

Also waht is teh difference between this setup and a distributed file system
then?

thanks and sorry if these are elimentary questions

B

On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 8:05 PM, wrote:

> As you know, a PARTITION is a structure comprising logically contiguous
> sectors on a disk.
>
> A VOLUME is a logical structure in which data is stored which may comprise
> one or more partitions. Consider a Volume that is striped or RAIDed. That
> Volume will span multiple physical partitions.
>
> Of course, the simplest variation of a Volume is the “Basic Volume” in
> which the Volume is composed of just one partition.
>
> Simple, right?
>
> Peter
> OSR
>
>
>
>
> —
> NTDEV is sponsored by OSR
>
> For our schedule of WDF, WDM, debugging and other seminars visit:
> http://www.osr.com/seminars
>
> To unsubscribe, visit the List Server section of OSR Online at
> http://www.osronline.com/page.cfm?name=ListServer
>

>> Also waht is teh difference between this setup and a distributed file system then?

Distributed file system manages different volumes spreaded over the network under a unique directory tree.

Different volumes mounted on different computers over the network are shown like folders to DFS users.


Fernando Roberto da Silva
DriverEntry Kernel Development
http://www.driverentry.com.br/en

Fernando,

thanks! So if I understand correctly, DFS will have a mount point in one of
the FS and through that mount point an extended tree will be viewed.

So, by definition a volume cannot span across machines? All those separate
partitions/hardrives would have to reside on the same node?

On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 8:20 PM, wrote:

> >> Also waht is teh difference between this setup and a distributed file
> system then?
>
> Distributed file system manages different volumes spreaded over the network
> under a unique directory tree.
>
> Different volumes mounted on different computers over the network are shown
> like folders to DFS users.
>
> –
> Fernando Roberto da Silva
> DriverEntry Kernel Development
> http://www.driverentry.com.br/en
>
> —
> NTDEV is sponsored by OSR
>
> For our schedule of WDF, WDM, debugging and other seminars visit:
> http://www.osr.com/seminars
>
> To unsubscribe, visit the List Server section of OSR Online at
> http://www.osronline.com/page.cfm?name=ListServer
>

As far as I know, that’s correct.


Fernando Roberto da Silva
DriverEntry Kernel Development
http://www.driverentry.com.br/en