Re: Multiple computers available on 1394 connection?

Does anyone happen to have a 1394 hub-based configuration actually
running? I finally got around to picking up a 1394 hub for the
purpose of WinDBG, but I’m not having success as of yet.

When I have a direct cable between two 1394 controllers, the Windows
machines detect each other and install the “1394 PC”-type device.
(Until, of course, I disable the 1394 controller on the target & the
1394 virtual network adapter on the host.)

With the hub in between the two computers, they never see each other
in this manner. (Nor does making a 1394 connection via WinDBG work
after setting everything up as I would for successfully using a direct
cable.)

Plugging in a 1394 device to the hub (such as one of my 1394 hard
drives) is detected and used successfully by the host computer. So
the hub configuration would appear to be “working”. The
computer-to-computer connection does not appear to work through the
hub, and nor does the WinDBG connection.

The hub I selected was IOGEAR model GFH610, for being powered & having
six ports (and not seeing other selection criteria that needed
consideration).

If anyone can share the equipment involved in a successful hub-based
WinDBG configuration, the information would be appreciated. Thanks.

xxxxx@online.microsoft.com (“Jeffrey Tan[MSFT]”) wrote:

Hi Alan,

Sorry for letting you wait for so long.

Yes, we can have multiple target computers attached to a single host for
1394 kd.

Based on the feedback from our product team, the limitation for the
connection is 63, however, we recommanded you use no more than 20
connections. The problem that we may run into is that any single problem on
the 1394 bus can take down the entire bus and the likelihood of this
happening increases with more target systems.

Yes, we can use a hub to have all of the systems connected at once, just
make sure that he specifies a unique channel number per target. Also, we’d
recommend that he keeps the 1394 topology as flat as possible ¨C plug all
targets into a hub, which plugs into a laptop ¨C instead of daisy-chaining
the 1394 targets (which should also work, but this configuration has a
tendency to cause problems).

Hope this information helps

Best regards,
Jeffrey Tan
Microsoft Online Partner Support
Get Secure! - www.microsoft.com/security
This posting is provided “as is” with no warranties and confers no rights.

“Alan Adams” wrote:
> >
> > What should my expectation be regarding the use of 1394 and having
> > multiple computers? Right now I always end up running WinDBG on my
> > laptop which only as a single 1394 connection anyway, and I just
> > physically move the 1394 cable to whichever computer out of my rack
> > that I’m debugging.
> >
> > But if I had multiple 1394 ports on my host computer, would I be able
> > to setup and leave “all computers connected” (physical cable to each
> > target, plugged into single controller on host), and then just select
> > which target I want via configured channel number? (Possibly even
> > running two different WinDBG instances concurrently, each connected to
> > a different 1394-based target.)
> >
> > I didn’t see any explicit acknowledgement of such a configuration in
> > the WinDBG documentation, and just wondered whether it was common
> > knowledge or someone had such a configuration working. Maybe I’m even
> > supposed to be able to achieve this with the single port on my host,
> > given that I see 1394 “hubs” just like you see for USB.
> >
> > Could be it’s a simple question and I’m just guilty of not paying
> > attention. Thanks for any information in the right direction.
> >
> > Alan Adams

Alan Adams
xxxxx@drcrumb.com
(for email, remove the crumbs)

Turn on the firewire nics on both sides and see if they are able to
communicate through hub before you attempt to setup debugging.

Yes folks at MS seem to have used hub to debug multiple targets from one
host. You can search list archives at osr to find the references.

Thanks for the indication that it really should probably be working. I
finally identified that the particular single target machine I was
using in my tests does not have success when plugged into the hub, and
kept everything from working when plugged in along with other targets.

With that machine removed, I’ve having exactly the experience
expected: My host laptop with a single 1394 port plugs into the hub,
and the hub in turn is plugged into three different target machines.
After assigning unique channel numbers to each target, I currently
have three different WinDBG instances running on the host machine
concurrently, each debugging a different target machine over 1394.

“Satya Das” wrote:

> Turn on the firewire nics on both sides and see if they are able to
> communicate through hub before you attempt to setup debugging.
>
> Yes folks at MS seem to have used hub to debug multiple targets from one
> host. You can search list archives at osr to find the references.

Alan Adams

At 08:03 AM 3/6/2006 -0700, Alan Adams wrote:

Does anyone happen to have a 1394 hub-based configuration actually
running?

For me, a Belkin FSU526 1394 hub is working well to support multiple
targets from a single host simultaneously, using separate instances
of WinDbg and separate 1394 channels.

Best regards,
David

Thanks. I haven’t been using the IOGEAR GFH610 long enough yet to say
for sure it’s “working well”, but its at least working initially. So
I hope references like yours will aid someone searching for tips on
what has worked.

Don’t know how common multiple-computer debugging configurations are;
maybe one day OSR will list a “known working” basic 1394 hub for sale,
in addition to their basic 1394 card.
(http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?article=411)

David Markun wrote:

> At 08:03 AM 3/6/2006 -0700, Alan Adams wrote:
> >Does anyone happen to have a 1394 hub-based configuration actually
> >running?
>
>
> For me, a Belkin FSU526 1394 hub is working well to support multiple
> targets from a single host simultaneously, using separate instances
> of WinDbg and separate 1394 channels.
>
> Best regards,
> David

Alan Adams