Oddball Serial Trackball

Hi. My company has a subsidiary which makes a serial trackball. We want to use it on Win2k and XP. But the trackball is odd. Instead of sending an ‘M’ like a normal plug-n-play serial pointing device, this thing sends a ‘T’. Therefore, it isn’t recognized by serenum as a mouse, so the driver isn’t loaded.

I looked at modifying serenum, but that is a protected system file and restored by Windows File Protection. So it seems like the wrong thing.

I am soliciting advice on solutions. I took the fantastic OSR WDM driver course, and have written 3 simple WDM drivers for custom PCI devices. But that hasn’t really prepared me to tackle this.

My first thought was to install the serial mouse driver on the COM port where the trackball is installed, just like the old days. But writing an INF file is daunting.

My second thought is taking the DDK samples and creating serenum2, and installing that beside serenum. But that seems like a lot of work.

Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.

john reilly.
Sperry Marine


Sent via the WebMail system at mail.nexet.net

I suppose you’ve already considered the obvious solution of changing the
‘T’ to an ‘M’ in the trackball firmware/hardware, right?

Could you write a serial filter driver that just knows (from other context)
that it’s a SerMouse probe, and if it’s seeing a T, return ‘M’?


Mats

xxxxx@lists.osr.com wrote on 10/22/2004 03:02:34 PM:

Hi. My company has a subsidiary which makes a serial trackball. We
want to use it on Win2k and XP. But the trackball is odd. Instead
of sending an ‘M’ like a normal plug-n-play serial pointing device,
this thing sends a ‘T’. Therefore, it isn’t recognized by serenum
as a mouse, so the driver isn’t loaded.

I looked at modifying serenum, but that is a protected system file
and restored by Windows File Protection. So it seems like the wrong
thing.

I am soliciting advice on solutions. I took the fantastic OSR WDM
driver course, and have written 3 simple WDM drivers for custom PCI
devices. But that hasn’t really prepared me to tackle this.

My first thought was to install the serial mouse driver on the COM
port where the trackball is installed, just like the old days. But
writing an INF file is daunting.

My second thought is taking the DDK samples and creating serenum2,
and installing that beside serenum. But that seems like a lot of work.

Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.

john reilly.
Sperry Marine


Sent via the WebMail system at mail.nexet.net


Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at http://www.
osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@3dlabs.com
To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com

ForwardSourceID:NT00005EEE

  1. outside of returning T, does the mouse behave like a normal serial
    mouse? Ie if sermouse were to be coerced to load for your device, would
    it function properly?

  2. does serenum actually enumerate PDO for your device after it has
    been detected? Open up device manage, change the view to view by
    connection and find the serial ports. Is there a ?'ed child device of
    the serial port?

d

-----Original Message-----
From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
[mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] On Behalf Of John Reilly
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2004 7:03 AM
To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
Subject: [ntdev] Oddball Serial Trackball

Hi. My company has a subsidiary which makes a serial trackball. We
want to use it on Win2k and XP. But the trackball is odd. Instead of
sending an ‘M’ like a normal plug-n-play serial pointing device, this
thing sends a ‘T’. Therefore, it isn’t recognized by serenum as a
mouse, so the driver isn’t loaded.

I looked at modifying serenum, but that is a protected system file and
restored by Windows File Protection. So it seems like the wrong thing.

I am soliciting advice on solutions. I took the fantastic OSR WDM
driver course, and have written 3 simple WDM drivers for custom PCI
devices. But that hasn’t really prepared me to tackle this.

My first thought was to install the serial mouse driver on the COM port
where the trackball is installed, just like the old days. But writing
an INF file is daunting.

My second thought is taking the DDK samples and creating serenum2, and
installing that beside serenum. But that seems like a lot of work.

Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.

john reilly.
Sperry Marine


Sent via the WebMail system at mail.nexet.net


Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@windows.microsoft.com
To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com

Doron and Mats:

Thanks. My first reaction was to ask the FW guys to change the T to an M.
It originally **was** that way, but they changed it. The trackball was
designed for a dedicated radar system. They wanted to be able to tell the
difference between their own trackball and a “normal” one.

As far as I know, it behaves just like a normal mouse. I will try what you
suggest, Doron, and see what happens.

Thanks.

john.

“Doron Holan” wrote in message
news:xxxxx@ntdev…
1) outside of returning T, does the mouse behave like a normal serial
mouse? Ie if sermouse were to be coerced to load for your device, would
it function properly?

2) does serenum actually enumerate PDO for your device after it has
been detected? Open up device manage, change the view to view by
connection and find the serial ports. Is there a ?'ed child device of
the serial port?

d

If you can still change the firmware, I would have the device fully
conform to the serenum spec. it can then report a hardware ID which
will unique ID the device.

If 2) is the case, get the hw IDs for the child device and write an INF
that will install sermouse.sys onto the device. See
%windir%\inf\msmouse.inf for an example of how to install sermouse.

d

-----Original Message-----
From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
[mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] On Behalf Of John Reilly
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2004 2:25 PM
To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
Subject: Re:[ntdev] Oddball Serial Trackball

Doron and Mats:

Thanks. My first reaction was to ask the FW guys to change the T to an
M.
It originally **was** that way, but they changed it. The trackball was
designed for a dedicated radar system. They wanted to be able to tell
the
difference between their own trackball and a “normal” one.

As far as I know, it behaves just like a normal mouse. I will try what
you
suggest, Doron, and see what happens.

Thanks.

john.

“Doron Holan” wrote in message
news:xxxxx@ntdev…
1) outside of returning T, does the mouse behave like a normal serial
mouse? Ie if sermouse were to be coerced to load for your device, would
it function properly?

2) does serenum actually enumerate PDO for your device after it has
been detected? Open up device manage, change the view to view by
connection and find the serial ports. Is there a ?'ed child device of
the serial port?

d


Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@windows.microsoft.com
To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com