enum\Root\LEGACY_ keys

I’ve noticed a legacy filter driver I have leaves behind keys in
HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Enum\Root\LEGACY_<driver_name>. It appears
theses are made by the SCM the first time the driver is started (or so it
would appear from watching regmon). They are not removed when I delete
the service entry however (and are persistent across boots as well).
I’ve contemplated simply programatically removing these after I
un-install, but keys in Enum are definately owned by the system…

I’m looking around for a clue if I’ve just structured something
incorrectly in that my filter driver is appearing as a legacy device, or
my install/un-install methodology is flawed.

I’ve noticed this happens for just about any legacy filter or file system
driver you install/un-install.

Thanks!

Tracy Camp</driver_name>

You can easily delete those entries in XP and below. Vista protects them
even more. Microsoft does not want them deleted, but testing initial
installs have to be done by reloading the OS. Too many people were playing
with those keys so Vista has made it more difficult to modify or delete
them.

“Tracy Camp” wrote in message news:xxxxx@ntfsd…
>
> I’ve noticed a legacy filter driver I have leaves behind keys in
> HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Enum\Root\LEGACY_<driver_name>. It appears
> theses are made by the SCM the first time the driver is started (or so it
> would appear from watching regmon). They are not removed when I delete
> the service entry however (and are persistent across boots as well). I’ve
> contemplated simply programatically removing these after I un-install, but
> keys in Enum are definately owned by the system…
>
> I’m looking around for a clue if I’ve just structured something
> incorrectly in that my filter driver is appearing as a legacy device, or
> my install/un-install methodology is flawed.
>
> I’ve noticed this happens for just about any legacy filter or file system
> driver you install/un-install.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Tracy Camp
></driver_name>