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Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.

Jussi_RytilahtiJussi_Rytilahti Member Posts: 35
Hi,

I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now I´d
like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time
same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by Windows
DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation of this
wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs

Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
wizard works only in 6.0)

BR.
Jussi

Comments

  • Don_Burn_1Don_Burn_1 Member Posts: 4,311
    With the current versions of the DDK (yours is 3 revs back, but still in
    this category), the compiler to use is provided by the DDK. I don't know if
    Walter has a fix for this, have you downloaded the service pack for his code
    from http://www.oneysoft.com/newpack.htm



    --
    Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    Remove StopSpam from the email to reply


    "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    > Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    > I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    > time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation
    > of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs
    >
    > Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    > wizard works only in 6.0)
    >
    > BR.
    > Jussi
    >
    >
  • Jussi_RytilahtiJussi_Rytilahti Member Posts: 35
    Hi,

    Thanks for you answer.I tried that update, but it did not help me, I am
    still getting same error.

    I have tried to open same project in .NET and I dont get that same error.

    So only VC++6.0 is causing troubles?

    Jussi

    "Don Burn" kirjoitti viestissä:[email protected]
    > With the current versions of the DDK (yours is 3 revs back, but still in
    > this category), the compiler to use is provided by the DDK. I don't know
    > if Walter has a fix for this, have you downloaded the service pack for his
    > code from http://www.oneysoft.com/newpack.htm
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    > Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    > Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >
    >
    > "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    >> Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    >> I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get
    >> every time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not
    >> supported by Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and
    >> .NET DDKs
    >>
    >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    >> wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>
    >> BR.
    >> Jussi
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  • Don_Burn_1Don_Burn_1 Member Posts: 4,311
    No, the bottom line is that you should be using the compiler from the DDK to
    build things. Anything else will just cause bugs.


    --
    Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    Remove StopSpam from the email to reply


    "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > Thanks for you answer.I tried that update, but it did not help me, I am
    > still getting same error.
    >
    > I have tried to open same project in .NET and I dont get that same error.
    >
    > So only VC++6.0 is causing troubles?
    >
    > Jussi
    >
    > "Don Burn" kirjoitti viestissä:[email protected]
    >> With the current versions of the DDK (yours is 3 revs back, but still in
    >> this category), the compiler to use is provided by the DDK. I don't know
    >> if Walter has a fix for this, have you downloaded the service pack for
    >> his code from http://www.oneysoft.com/newpack.htm
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    >> Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    >> Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >>
    >>
    >> "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    >>> Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    >>> I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get
    >>> every time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not
    >>> supported by Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    >>> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and
    >>> .NET DDKs
    >>>
    >>> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    >>> wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>>
    >>> BR.
    >>> Jussi
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Hi, Jussi,

    With all due respect to Walter's outstanding presence in the
    kernel dev world and his excellent book and software, I really
    do believe that if you're a newbie you should not use wizards to
    generate code. Wizards and code generators are more adequate for
    senior developers, who can see between the lines and who can
    modify the generated code if need be! Moreover, it's an
    invaluable experience to get one's own code to work, there's no
    replacement for that.

    Now, can you use VC6 to do drivers ? Yes you can - and I say
    that knowing that many a very senior poster in this list will
    frontally disagree with me. I have used VC6 myself over and
    again, my code works, and I've seen very serious pieces of
    driver code built with VC6. However...

    That said, I warn you, this is not for newbies. I would stick to
    the DDK compiler, not because it's "safer" or because it's "the
    rule" or any other nonsense in that general direction. My point
    is, it's EASIER, way easier. You avoid having to deal with
    issues of code generation, which will on occasion generate
    problems that need specialized knowledge to solve. If you're a
    senior hat you will naturally compensate for that when you write
    your code, but even then, that may take a level of knowledge of
    compiler technology that not everyone may be willing to amass.

    And you're going to bump into issues such as yours: Walter's
    wizard seems to require you to use the DDK compiler, and you may
    find yourself into other situations where actions by other
    people constrain your power of choice.

    What you can do, and it's a very easy step, is to set up your
    VC6 shell to use the DDK compiler. I usually set up a project
    with all my driver sources, and if I want to be conservative and
    be able to use build.exe to build the driver, this is what I do:

    1. The ddk compiler is at
    %myddkdroot%\%myddkversion%\bin\%mymachine%. For example,
    c:\winddk\3970.1830\bin\x86. I use my "tools/options" to put
    that directory on the very top of the executable path. I do the
    same for includes and library files. Once I do that, I have a
    setup that will run ddk software when I need it.

    2. I set whatever other non-ddk paths in my project settings.

    3. I invoke the vc6 shell (msdev.exe) from inside one of the ddk
    cmd boxes (checked or free build for %mymachine%). This gives me
    a very nice editing and project management environment. But note
    that even now I cannot build using the VC6 build toolbar,
    because the -D external variables aren't set. So,

    4. I set up a custom build step to run build.exe. Or else I can
    just have both the VC6 IDE and the DDK cmd box open, and I can
    run build.exe from the cmd box while I edit and manage my
    project from the IDE. This has the added advantage that I can
    use project/settings to point the project to the adequate source
    control, which integrates editing and checking files in or out.
    Furthermore, if my driver is complicated enough that I have a
    component that doesn't call any OS entry point and that can be
    packaged as a separate library or dll (most of my drivers fell
    under that category, if nothing else because in many occasions I
    have to write them so that most of the code was portable between
    Windows, Linux, and other Unix-like OS's), that component can be
    built by the IDE and linked into the driver by adding the
    resulting library or libraries to your sources file.

    5. An added benefit is that you can have both the driver and the
    app in the same VC6 workspace, for example, in two separate
    projects. Even if you don't use the IDE to build your driver,
    you can use it to build the app, and the IDE provides you with a
    very convenient way of sharing common components such as include
    files or even libraries.

    Note that this is even more convenient with VS.NET, because it
    has a huge amount of programmability and scripting ability:
    whatever functionality the IDE lacks you can readily add in by
    writing a macro or an addin.

    I hope this helps, if not, discard it!

    Alberto.



    "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am
    > reading Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows
    > Driver Model, Ed2" and now I´d like to try his AppWizard for
    > Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time same error :
    > error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    > Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0
    > and XP and .NET DDKs
    >
    > Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also
    > .NET, but wizard works only in 6.0)
    >
    > BR.
    > Jussi
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Just for completeness, remember that it's very easy to get the
    IDE to use the DDK compiler: just point to it in your
    Tools/Options/Directories. Two different issues, compiler and
    environment. Applies to both VC6 and VS.NET.

    And, btw, I have put plenty of drivers into production using
    nothing but VC6, or VC1.4 before that.

    Alberto.


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Don Burn" <[email protected]>
    Newsgroups: ntdev
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    <[email protected]>
    Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 8:10 AM
    Subject: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows
    DDK.


    > No, the bottom line is that you should be using the compiler
    > from the DDK to build things. Anything else will just cause
    > bugs.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    > Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    > Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >
    >
    > "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Thanks for you answer.I tried that update, but it did not
    >> help me, I am still getting same error.
    >>
    >> I have tried to open same project in .NET and I dont get that
    >> same error.
    >>
    >> So only VC++6.0 is causing troubles?
    >>
    >> Jussi
    >>
    >> "Don Burn" <[email protected]> kirjoitti viestissä:[email protected]
    >>> With the current versions of the DDK (yours is 3 revs back,
    >>> but still in this category), the compiler to use is provided
    >>> by the DDK. I don't know if Walter has a fix for this, have
    >>> you downloaded the service pack for his code from
    >>> http://www.oneysoft.com/newpack.htm
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    >>> Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    >>> Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>> message news:[email protected]
    >>>> Hi,
    >>>>
    >>>> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am
    >>>> reading Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft
    >>>> Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now I´d like to try his
    >>>> AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time
    >>>> same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not
    >>>> supported by Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and
    >>>> working OS is XP. Documentation of this wizard says that
    >>>> wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs
    >>>>
    >>>> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    >>>> also .NET, but wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>>>
    >>>> BR.
    >>>> Jussi
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
  • Gary_LittleGary_Little Member Posts: 335
    Instead of wasting time mucking around with the IDE, spend your time
    developing your driver code. Get DDKBUILD either from www.hollistech.com or
    www.osronline.com and use the IDE to create a MAKEFILE project. That will
    work across any version of Visual Studio including the 2005 beta 2.

    --
    The personal opinion of
    Gary G. Little

    "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    > Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    > I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    > time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation
    > of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs
    >
    > Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    > wizard works only in 6.0)
    >
    > BR.
    > Jussi
    >
    >
  • Gary_LittleGary_Little Member Posts: 335
    DDKBUILD does ALL of that for you and you can migrate the project from VS
    version to VS version with little or no heartburn. Migrating a DSW to a .NET
    2003 SLN to a 2005 SLN is going to induce multiple errors that are a pain in
    the ass with which to deal. It is so very very simple to remove all the if's
    and's or but's here. Use DDKBUILD and create a makefile IDE project. THAT
    will migrate to any version of VS and you can do what you are paid to do:
    develop driver code, NOT muck around with silly ass settings in the IDE.

    I feel like Obi Wan ... "Use DDKBUILD Luke"

    --
    The personal opinion of
    Gary G. Little

    "Alberto Moreira" wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Hi, Jussi,
    >
    > With all due respect to Walter's outstanding presence in the kernel dev
    > world and his excellent book and software, I really do believe that if
    > you're a newbie you should not use wizards to generate code. Wizards and
    > code generators are more adequate for senior developers, who can see
    > between the lines and who can modify the generated code if need be!
    > Moreover, it's an invaluable experience to get one's own code to work,
    > there's no replacement for that.
    >
    > Now, can you use VC6 to do drivers ? Yes you can - and I say that knowing
    > that many a very senior poster in this list will frontally disagree with
    > me. I have used VC6 myself over and again, my code works, and I've seen
    > very serious pieces of driver code built with VC6. However...
    >
    > That said, I warn you, this is not for newbies. I would stick to the DDK
    > compiler, not because it's "safer" or because it's "the rule" or any other
    > nonsense in that general direction. My point is, it's EASIER, way easier.
    > You avoid having to deal with issues of code generation, which will on
    > occasion generate problems that need specialized knowledge to solve. If
    > you're a senior hat you will naturally compensate for that when you write
    > your code, but even then, that may take a level of knowledge of compiler
    > technology that not everyone may be willing to amass.
    >
    > And you're going to bump into issues such as yours: Walter's wizard seems
    > to require you to use the DDK compiler, and you may find yourself into
    > other situations where actions by other people constrain your power of
    > choice.
    >
    > What you can do, and it's a very easy step, is to set up your VC6 shell to
    > use the DDK compiler. I usually set up a project with all my driver
    > sources, and if I want to be conservative and be able to use build.exe to
    > build the driver, this is what I do:
    >
    > 1. The ddk compiler is at %myddkdroot%\%myddkversion%\bin\%mymachine%. For
    > example, c:\winddk\3970.1830\bin\x86. I use my "tools/options" to put that
    > directory on the very top of the executable path. I do the same for
    > includes and library files. Once I do that, I have a setup that will run
    > ddk software when I need it.
    >
    > 2. I set whatever other non-ddk paths in my project settings.
    >
    > 3. I invoke the vc6 shell (msdev.exe) from inside one of the ddk cmd boxes
    > (checked or free build for %mymachine%). This gives me a very nice editing
    > and project management environment. But note that even now I cannot build
    > using the VC6 build toolbar, because the -D external variables aren't set.
    > So,
    >
    > 4. I set up a custom build step to run build.exe. Or else I can just have
    > both the VC6 IDE and the DDK cmd box open, and I can run build.exe from
    > the cmd box while I edit and manage my project from the IDE. This has the
    > added advantage that I can use project/settings to point the project to
    > the adequate source control, which integrates editing and checking files
    > in or out. Furthermore, if my driver is complicated enough that I have a
    > component that doesn't call any OS entry point and that can be packaged as
    > a separate library or dll (most of my drivers fell under that category, if
    > nothing else because in many occasions I have to write them so that most
    > of the code was portable between Windows, Linux, and other Unix-like
    > OS's), that component can be built by the IDE and linked into the driver
    > by adding the resulting library or libraries to your sources file.
    >
    > 5. An added benefit is that you can have both the driver and the app in
    > the same VC6 workspace, for example, in two separate projects. Even if you
    > don't use the IDE to build your driver, you can use it to build the app,
    > and the IDE provides you with a very convenient way of sharing common
    > components such as include files or even libraries.
    >
    > Note that this is even more convenient with VS.NET, because it has a huge
    > amount of programmability and scripting ability: whatever functionality
    > the IDE lacks you can readily add in by writing a macro or an addin.
    >
    > I hope this helps, if not, discard it!
    >
    > Alberto.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    >> Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    >> I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get
    >> every time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not
    >> supported by Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and
    >> .NET DDKs
    >>
    >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    >> wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>
    >> BR.
    >> Jussi
    >>
    >>
    >> ---
    >> Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    >> http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >>
    >> You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    >> To unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
    >
    >
  • Peter_Viscarola_(OSR)Peter_Viscarola_(OSR) Administrator Posts: 8,846
    Jussi Rytilahti wrote:
    >
    > Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    > wizard works only in 6.0)
    >

    Zzzzzzzzzzzz...

    Instead of spending time with new posts, or causing us all to repeat
    positions we've posted, oh, eight or ten thousand times before, please
    read the archives and the FAQ: www.osronline.com

    Peter
    OSR

    Peter Viscarola
    OSR
    @OSRDrivers

  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    With all due respect to Hollistech and to OSR, you need zero
    third party software here.

    Point your IDE to the DDK compiler, setup a project for your
    driver - the settings are irrelevant - setup a custom build step
    that invokes build.exe (or set it up so that you can reach it
    from tools/external tools, or if you're really fastidious set up
    a build button on a toolbar), and setup an icon on your desktop
    to run DEVENV.EXE from inside a checked or free build cmd
    prompt: done. Takes what, five minutes work ?

    Also, no driver lives alone: one often needs applications, and
    it's nice to have both projects under the same IDE workspace so
    that if nothing else they can share include files and the like.
    And if you really want to pig out, you can write a ten-line
    script that runs build.exe to build your driver but the full IDE
    build to make the app, link it to your build button, again,
    done.

    Use the IDE, dude.

    Alberto.



    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Gary G. Little" <[email protected]>
    Newsgroups: ntdev
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    <[email protected]>
    Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:18 AM
    Subject: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows
    DDK.


    > Instead of wasting time mucking around with the IDE, spend
    > your time developing your driver code. Get DDKBUILD either
    > from www.hollistech.com or www.osronline.com and use the IDE
    > to create a MAKEFILE project. That will work across any
    > version of Visual Studio including the 2005 beta 2.
    >
    > --
    > The personal opinion of
    > Gary G. Little
    >
    > "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am
    >> reading Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows
    >> Driver Model, Ed2" and now I´d like to try his AppWizard for
    >> Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time same error :
    >> error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    >> Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0
    >> and XP and .NET DDKs
    >>
    >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    >> also .NET, but wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>
    >> BR.
    >> Jussi
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
  • Jussi_RytilahtiJussi_Rytilahti Member Posts: 35
    Hi,

    Thanks again.

    VC ++ is linked to DDK already, I think? The spot where VC++ 6.0 is stoping
    is:

    #if _MSC_VER < 1300
    #error Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK
    #endif

    And .NET won´t stop to that same spot.

    So what this "if" is checking?

    Jussi

    "Don Burn" kirjoitti viestissä:[email protected]
    > No, the bottom line is that you should be using the compiler from the DDK
    > to build things. Anything else will just cause bugs.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    > Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    > Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >
    >
    > "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Thanks for you answer.I tried that update, but it did not help me, I am
    >> still getting same error.
    >>
    >> I have tried to open same project in .NET and I dont get that same error.
    >>
    >> So only VC++6.0 is causing troubles?
    >>
    >> Jussi
    >>
    >> "Don Burn" kirjoitti viestissä:[email protected]
    >>> With the current versions of the DDK (yours is 3 revs back, but still in
    >>> this category), the compiler to use is provided by the DDK. I don't
    >>> know if Walter has a fix for this, have you downloaded the service pack
    >>> for his code from http://www.oneysoft.com/newpack.htm
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    >>> Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    >>> Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>> Hi,
    >>>>
    >>>> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    >>>> Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and
    >>>> now I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I
    >>>> get every time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not
    >>>> supported by Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is
    >>>> XP. Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP
    >>>> and .NET DDKs
    >>>>
    >>>> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET,
    >>>> but wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>>>
    >>>> BR.
    >>>> Jussi
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  • Jussi_RytilahtiJussi_Rytilahti Member Posts: 35
    Thanks all!

    I have already tested "ddkbuild"-tool and original "build" also.

    @Gary:And I like this ddkbuild and I am using it in my "training project" in
    .NET 2003 and it seems to work very fine.

    @Alberto:Your absolutelly right with this "try+success=learn" (Or something
    like that). I will test your way also.

    @PeterGV: I have tried look answer from you pages but I have not successed
    with this problem: Why I get this error in VC6 but not .NET and Is that
    possible to try this wizard in VC6 with my DDK.

    So, question is :can I even try this wizard? Becource .AWX it is only
    working in VC6, but I get that error. If I take all files which wizard has
    created and build them in .NET (in project which uses ddkbuild) I will
    succeed....Is the only way out: Create files in vc6 with wizard and then
    build them in .NET?

    Jussi

    "Jussi Rytilahti" kirjoitti
    viestissä:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    > Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    > I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    > time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation
    > of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs
    >
    > Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    > wizard works only in 6.0)
    >
    > BR.
    > Jussi
    >
    >
  • Don_Burn_1Don_Burn_1 Member Posts: 4,311
    This is checking that the version of the compiler is new enough for
    constructs in the file. Since you are trying to use an old version of the
    compiler, instead of the one in the DDK you are hitting this.

    But even if you found a Visual Studio with the correct version, trying to
    compile with it directly (versus using the BUILD tool from the DDK) will
    cause bugs, even if it appears to work it is likely to have problems. At
    best using anything other than the supplied tools is stupid, and worst it is
    unprofessional and criminally negligent.


    --
    Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    Remove StopSpam from the email to reply


    "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    > VC ++ is linked to DDK already, I think? The spot where VC++ 6.0 is
    > stoping is:
    >
    > #if _MSC_VER < 1300
    > #error Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK
    > #endif
    >
    > And .NET won´t stop to that same spot.
    >
    > So what this "if" is checking?
    >
    > Jussi
    >
    > "Don Burn" kirjoitti viestissä:[email protected]
    >> No, the bottom line is that you should be using the compiler from the DDK
    >> to build things. Anything else will just cause bugs.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    >> Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    >> Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >>
    >>
    >> "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for you answer.I tried that update, but it did not help me, I am
    >>> still getting same error.
    >>>
    >>> I have tried to open same project in .NET and I dont get that same
    >>> error.
    >>>
    >>> So only VC++6.0 is causing troubles?
    >>>
    >>> Jussi
    >>>
    >>> "Don Burn" kirjoitti viestissä:[email protected]
    >>>> With the current versions of the DDK (yours is 3 revs back, but still
    >>>> in this category), the compiler to use is provided by the DDK. I don't
    >>>> know if Walter has a fix for this, have you downloaded the service pack
    >>>> for his code from http://www.oneysoft.com/newpack.htm
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    >>>> Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    >>>> Remove StopSpam from the email to reply
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    >>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>> Hi,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading
    >>>>> Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model,
    >>>>> Ed2" and now I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0
    >>>>> (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time same error : error C1189: #error :
    >>>>> Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK. I am using DDK
    >>>>> 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation of this wizard says that
    >>>>> wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET,
    >>>>> but wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> BR.
    >>>>> Jussi
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  • Don_Burn_1Don_Burn_1 Member Posts: 4,311
    Do not use the wizard. Do not folllow Alberto's advice, since the learing
    you mention will probably be at the cost of subtle bugs that appear in your
    code, that may impact other peoples systems.

    Playing is fine, but the bottom line is that driver development is hard
    work. Adding to the work by using non-standard unreliable practices is
    stupidity of the worst kind.


    --
    Don Burn (MVP, Windows DDK)
    Windows 2k/XP/2k3 Filesystem and Driver Consulting
    Remove StopSpam from the email to reply



    "Jussi Rytilahti" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Thanks all!
    >
    > I have already tested "ddkbuild"-tool and original "build" also.
    >
    > @Gary:And I like this ddkbuild and I am using it in my "training project"
    > in .NET 2003 and it seems to work very fine.
    >
    > @Alberto:Your absolutelly right with this "try+success=learn" (Or
    > something like that). I will test your way also.
    >
    > @PeterGV: I have tried look answer from you pages but I have not successed
    > with this problem: Why I get this error in VC6 but not .NET and Is that
    > possible to try this wizard in VC6 with my DDK.
    >
    > So, question is :can I even try this wizard? Becource .AWX it is only
    > working in VC6, but I get that error. If I take all files which wizard has
    > created and build them in .NET (in project which uses ddkbuild) I will
    > succeed....Is the only way out: Create files in vc6 with wizard and then
    > build them in .NET?
    >
    > Jussi
    >
    > "Jussi Rytilahti" kirjoitti
    > viestissä:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    >> Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    >> I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get
    >> every time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not
    >> supported by Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and
    >> .NET DDKs
    >>
    >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    >> wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>
    >> BR.
    >> Jussi
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  • Mark_RoddyMark_Roddy Member - All Emails Posts: 4,480
    Invoking build.exe directly is insufficient as build.exe depends on the
    environment set up by the setenv.bat script that comes with the ddk. That
    script in turn requires specific command line arguments. The appropriate
    command line arguments to setenv.bat change from release to release. The '10
    line shell script', done correctly is more like 100-200 lines. Thus the
    venerable ddkbuild.bat, which has managed to do this correctly (more or
    less, your mileage may vary) since 1996.

    =====================
    Mark Roddy DDK MVP
    Windows 2003/XP/2000 Consulting
    Hollis Technology Solutions 603-321-1032
    www.hollistech.com

    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: [email protected]
    > [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Alberto Moreira
    > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:47 PM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: Re: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.
    >
    > With all due respect to Hollistech and to OSR, you need zero
    > third party software here.
    >
    > Point your IDE to the DDK compiler, setup a project for your
    > driver - the settings are irrelevant - setup a custom build
    > step that invokes build.exe (or set it up so that you can
    > reach it from tools/external tools, or if you're really
    > fastidious set up a build button on a toolbar), and setup an
    > icon on your desktop to run DEVENV.EXE from inside a checked
    > or free build cmd
    > prompt: done. Takes what, five minutes work ?
    >
    > Also, no driver lives alone: one often needs applications,
    > and it's nice to have both projects under the same IDE
    > workspace so that if nothing else they can share include
    > files and the like.
    > And if you really want to pig out, you can write a ten-line
    > script that runs build.exe to build your driver but the full
    > IDE build to make the app, link it to your build button, again, done.
    >
    > Use the IDE, dude.
    >
    > Alberto.
    >
    >
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Gary G. Little" <[email protected]>
    > Newsgroups: ntdev
    > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > <[email protected]>
    > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:18 AM
    > Subject: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.
    >
    >
    > > Instead of wasting time mucking around with the IDE, spend
    > your time
    > > developing your driver code. Get DDKBUILD either from
    > > www.hollistech.com or www.osronline.com and use the IDE to create a
    > > MAKEFILE project. That will work across any version of
    > Visual Studio
    > > including the 2005 beta 2.
    > >
    > > --
    > > The personal opinion of
    > > Gary G. Little
    > >
    > > "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> Hi,
    > >>
    > >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading
    > >> Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model,
    > >> Ed2" and now I?d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0
    > >> (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time same error :
    > >> error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK.
    > >> I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    > >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for
    > VC++6.0 and XP
    > >> and .NET DDKs
    > >>
    > >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    > also .NET,
    > >> but wizard works only in 6.0)
    > >>
    > >> BR.
    > >> Jussi
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ---
    > > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >
    > > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected] To
    > > unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > [email protected] To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
    >
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Hi Jussi,

    Several months ago when I started to work with drivers I ran into a
    similar problem. Please take all of this with a grain of salt, since
    the details are fuzzy in my head, but the summary is that my paths were
    incorrect / out of order when I tried to build a driver from VC6.

    First the setup, I had VC6, VS.NET, and the latest DDK installed. I was
    trying to work on building a driver from VC6 and got a "Compiler not
    supported" error.

    If I look at the C compiler from the 2003DDK, (just open a build
    environment and type cl.exe), I get the following:
    Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 13.10.2179

    If I look at the compiler from .NET, I get:
    Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 13.10.3077

    And if I remember correctly, the compiler from VC6 is version
    12...something.

    So the following will fail if you use the VC6 compiler:

    #if _MSC_VER < 1300
    #error Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK
    #endif


    When you try and build from VC6, the IDE is probably finding its
    compiler before it finds the DDK one, thus the preprocessor check
    fails. And it will work in .NET no matter what the paths because the
    .NET compiler is newer than the DDK compiler.

    My solution at the time was to go back to using the Build Environment
    shortcuts, then later integrate one of the ddkbuild utilities into an
    IDE that I liked.

    While I'm not sure if this solves any of your problems, maybe it can
    give you some more insight into it.

    Best Regards,
    -Mike



    Jussi Rytilahti wrote:

    >Thanks all!
    >
    >I have already tested "ddkbuild"-tool and original "build" also.
    >
    >@Gary:And I like this ddkbuild and I am using it in my "training project" in
    >.NET 2003 and it seems to work very fine.
    >
    >@Alberto:Your absolutelly right with this "try+success=learn" (Or something
    >like that). I will test your way also.
    >
    >@PeterGV: I have tried look answer from you pages but I have not successed
    >with this problem: Why I get this error in VC6 but not .NET and Is that
    >possible to try this wizard in VC6 with my DDK.
    >
    >So, question is :can I even try this wizard? Becource .AWX it is only
    >working in VC6, but I get that error. If I take all files which wizard has
    >created and build them in .NET (in project which uses ddkbuild) I will
    >succeed....Is the only way out: Create files in vc6 with wizard and then
    >build them in .NET?
    >
    >Jussi
    >
    >"Jussi Rytilahti" kirjoitti
    >viestissä:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    >>Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    >>I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    >>time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    >>Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation
    >>of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs
    >>
    >>Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    >>wizard works only in 6.0)
    >>
    >>BR.
    >>Jussi
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    >---
    >Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    >You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    >To unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
    >
    >
    >
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Ok, the details.

    1. Set up an auxiliary batch file. Call it drvbuild.bat:

    call %winddk%\bin\setenv %winddk% chk wnet
    devenv

    Of course %winddk% is your ddkroot, say, c:\winddk\3790.1830,
    and devenv.exe's directory is in your path.

    2. Setup a link on your desktop, for properties put something
    like

    "%windir%\system32\cmd /k
    %yourexecutabledirectory%\drvbuild.bat"

    Now every time you click on that icon you get an msvc.net shell
    with all the ddk environment set up. Or, if you're lazy, just
    bring up the checked or free cmd window of your preference, type
    "devenv" at the prompt and press enter.

    3. Bring up your devenv.exe. Click File/New/Project/Visual C++
    Projects. Choose "Makefile Project".

    4. Set your path and project name, click "ok".

    5. Click "Application Settings".

    6. Enter your settings:

    6a. Your build command line is "%windir%\bin\x86\build.
    6b. Your output is whatever your driver's name happens to
    be.
    6c. Your clean commands are whatever you need to wipe out
    your obj files.
    6d. Your rebuild command line is "%windir%\bin\x86\build -c"

    Note that if you just leave these fields blank you can set them
    in your Project/Properties window, which allows you to enter
    multiple lines for each command: you can add debugging
    information and other stuff if you feel like.

    7. Now your project's up. Go Tools/Options/Projects/VC++
    Directories and add your %windir%\bin\x86 directory to the top
    of the executable list. That will make sure you use the DDK
    compiler and linker when you build. If you're supersticious,
    also add %windir%\bin to the executable list.

    8. Now go Project/Properties and tweak your settings. Don't
    forget to set them up for the Release build too. Also set your
    debugging so that if you press F5 or F10, the debugger goes
    directly to the top of your app (which, of course, you will have
    set up as another project inside the same solution!) Also, at
    this time you will want to add your own include and lib
    directories to the tools/options/projects/VC++ Directories
    lists.

    9. Add your source files to your project as you need them. Add
    your "sources" file to it too, you may need to tweak it here or
    there. Also, consider splitting parts of your driver into a
    DRIVER_LIBRARY component, it often helps.

    10. Now your environment is ready to be tested! Click on your
    "build sys" or "build solution" button, and you will get the IDE
    to build your driver using your sources, your
    makefile/makefile.inc as you feel fit, using build.exe and the
    ddk compiler and linker.

    There's a zillion variations around this theme, and you can set
    yourself up with other kinds of projects too, but this one is
    very, very easy: it takes about five to ten minutes work to set
    yourself up.

    I have also done this on occasion: build the driver once with
    build.exe, fish out the log, pull out the command line into a
    file, and get the shell to use the file as the source of its
    command line switches and variables to the C++ compiler. Or you
    can set up an utility project, that works too.

    I also call your attention to what I call the "asterisk
    notation" property of your sources file, where you can have
    build.exe automatically insert your architecture string (such as
    "i386", "amd64", etc.) in your directory and/or file names.
    Comes in handy at times!

    Alberto.





    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Mark Roddy" <[email protected]>
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    <[email protected]>
    Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 7:41 AM
    Subject: RE: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    Windows DDK.


    Invoking build.exe directly is insufficient as build.exe depends
    on the
    environment set up by the setenv.bat script that comes with the
    ddk. That
    script in turn requires specific command line arguments. The
    appropriate
    command line arguments to setenv.bat change from release to
    release. The '10
    line shell script', done correctly is more like 100-200 lines.
    Thus the
    venerable ddkbuild.bat, which has managed to do this correctly
    (more or
    less, your mileage may vary) since 1996.

    =====================
    Mark Roddy DDK MVP
    Windows 2003/XP/2000 Consulting
    Hollis Technology Solutions 603-321-1032
    www.hollistech.com

    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: [email protected]
    > [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Alberto
    > Moreira
    > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:47 PM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: Re: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK.
    >
    > With all due respect to Hollistech and to OSR, you need zero
    > third party software here.
    >
    > Point your IDE to the DDK compiler, setup a project for your
    > driver - the settings are irrelevant - setup a custom build
    > step that invokes build.exe (or set it up so that you can
    > reach it from tools/external tools, or if you're really
    > fastidious set up a build button on a toolbar), and setup an
    > icon on your desktop to run DEVENV.EXE from inside a checked
    > or free build cmd
    > prompt: done. Takes what, five minutes work ?
    >
    > Also, no driver lives alone: one often needs applications,
    > and it's nice to have both projects under the same IDE
    > workspace so that if nothing else they can share include
    > files and the like.
    > And if you really want to pig out, you can write a ten-line
    > script that runs build.exe to build your driver but the full
    > IDE build to make the app, link it to your build button,
    > again, done.
    >
    > Use the IDE, dude.
    >
    > Alberto.
    >
    >
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Gary G. Little" <[email protected]>
    > Newsgroups: ntdev
    > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > <[email protected]>
    > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:18 AM
    > Subject: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows
    > DDK.
    >
    >
    > > Instead of wasting time mucking around with the IDE, spend
    > your time
    > > developing your driver code. Get DDKBUILD either from
    > > www.hollistech.com or www.osronline.com and use the IDE to
    > > create a
    > > MAKEFILE project. That will work across any version of
    > Visual Studio
    > > including the 2005 beta 2.
    > >
    > > --
    > > The personal opinion of
    > > Gary G. Little
    > >
    > > "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> Hi,
    > >>
    > >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am
    > >> reading
    > >> Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver
    > >> Model,
    > >> Ed2" and now I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++
    > >> 6.0
    > >> (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time same error :
    > >> error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK.
    > >> I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    > >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for
    > VC++6.0 and XP
    > >> and .NET DDKs
    > >>
    > >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    > also .NET,
    > >> but wizard works only in 6.0)
    > >>
    > >> BR.
    > >> Jussi
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ---
    > > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >
    > > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > > To
    > > unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > > [email protected]
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > [email protected] To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
    >



    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: unknown lmsubst tag
    argument: ''
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    [email protected]
  • Mark_RoddyMark_Roddy Member - All Emails Posts: 4,480
    Yes of course you are right alberto. There couldn't possibly be anything
    else to it.

    Have you tried that on an mp machine? Ooops, error linkage in VS won't work.
    Have you tried to get bscmake to run so that you can use source browsing? It
    won't with that ddk, it will with ddkbuild which happens to know about the
    undocumented command line argument for turning bscmake support back on.
    There is a reason why ddkbuild has been out there for almost 10 years. Is
    there some reason why you seem to think it is the wrong way to go?

    =====================
    Mark Roddy DDK MVP
    Windows 2003/XP/2000 Consulting
    Hollis Technology Solutions 603-321-1032
    www.hollistech.com

    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: [email protected]
    > [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Alberto Moreira
    > Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 11:05 PM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: Re: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.
    >
    > Ok, the details.
    >
    > 1. Set up an auxiliary batch file. Call it drvbuild.bat:
    >
    > call %winddk%\bin\setenv %winddk% chk wnet
    > devenv
    >
    > Of course %winddk% is your ddkroot, say, c:\winddk\3790.1830,
    > and devenv.exe's directory is in your path.
    >
    > 2. Setup a link on your desktop, for properties put something like
    >
    > "%windir%\system32\cmd /k
    > %yourexecutabledirectory%\drvbuild.bat"
    >
    > Now every time you click on that icon you get an msvc.net
    > shell with all the ddk environment set up. Or, if you're
    > lazy, just bring up the checked or free cmd window of your
    > preference, type "devenv" at the prompt and press enter.
    >
    > 3. Bring up your devenv.exe. Click File/New/Project/Visual
    > C++ Projects. Choose "Makefile Project".
    >
    > 4. Set your path and project name, click "ok".
    >
    > 5. Click "Application Settings".
    >
    > 6. Enter your settings:
    >
    > 6a. Your build command line is "%windir%\bin\x86\build.
    > 6b. Your output is whatever your driver's name happens to be.
    > 6c. Your clean commands are whatever you need to wipe out
    > your obj files.
    > 6d. Your rebuild command line is "%windir%\bin\x86\build -c"
    >
    > Note that if you just leave these fields blank you can set
    > them in your Project/Properties window, which allows you to
    > enter multiple lines for each command: you can add debugging
    > information and other stuff if you feel like.
    >
    > 7. Now your project's up. Go Tools/Options/Projects/VC++
    > Directories and add your %windir%\bin\x86 directory to the
    > top of the executable list. That will make sure you use the
    > DDK compiler and linker when you build. If you're
    > supersticious, also add %windir%\bin to the executable list.
    >
    > 8. Now go Project/Properties and tweak your settings. Don't
    > forget to set them up for the Release build too. Also set
    > your debugging so that if you press F5 or F10, the debugger
    > goes directly to the top of your app (which, of course, you
    > will have set up as another project inside the same
    > solution!) Also, at this time you will want to add your own
    > include and lib directories to the
    > tools/options/projects/VC++ Directories lists.
    >
    > 9. Add your source files to your project as you need them.
    > Add your "sources" file to it too, you may need to tweak it
    > here or there. Also, consider splitting parts of your driver
    > into a DRIVER_LIBRARY component, it often helps.
    >
    > 10. Now your environment is ready to be tested! Click on your
    > "build sys" or "build solution" button, and you will get the
    > IDE to build your driver using your sources, your
    > makefile/makefile.inc as you feel fit, using build.exe and
    > the ddk compiler and linker.
    >
    > There's a zillion variations around this theme, and you can
    > set yourself up with other kinds of projects too, but this
    > one is very, very easy: it takes about five to ten minutes
    > work to set yourself up.
    >
    > I have also done this on occasion: build the driver once with
    > build.exe, fish out the log, pull out the command line into a
    > file, and get the shell to use the file as the source of its
    > command line switches and variables to the C++ compiler. Or
    > you can set up an utility project, that works too.
    >
    > I also call your attention to what I call the "asterisk
    > notation" property of your sources file, where you can have
    > build.exe automatically insert your architecture string (such
    > as "i386", "amd64", etc.) in your directory and/or file names.
    > Comes in handy at times!
    >
    > Alberto.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Mark Roddy" <[email protected]>
    > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > <[email protected]>
    > Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 7:41 AM
    > Subject: RE: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.
    >
    >
    > Invoking build.exe directly is insufficient as build.exe
    > depends on the environment set up by the setenv.bat script
    > that comes with the ddk. That script in turn requires
    > specific command line arguments. The appropriate command line
    > arguments to setenv.bat change from release to release. The
    > '10 line shell script', done correctly is more like 100-200 lines.
    > Thus the
    > venerable ddkbuild.bat, which has managed to do this
    > correctly (more or less, your mileage may vary) since 1996.
    >
    > =====================
    > Mark Roddy DDK MVP
    > Windows 2003/XP/2000 Consulting
    > Hollis Technology Solutions 603-321-1032 www.hollistech.com
    >
    > > -----Original Message-----
    > > From: [email protected]
    > > [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of
    > Alberto Moreira
    > > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:47 PM
    > > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > > Subject: Re: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK.
    > >
    > > With all due respect to Hollistech and to OSR, you need zero third
    > > party software here.
    > >
    > > Point your IDE to the DDK compiler, setup a project for
    > your driver -
    > > the settings are irrelevant - setup a custom build step
    > that invokes
    > > build.exe (or set it up so that you can reach it from
    > tools/external
    > > tools, or if you're really fastidious set up a build button on a
    > > toolbar), and setup an icon on your desktop to run DEVENV.EXE from
    > > inside a checked or free build cmd
    > > prompt: done. Takes what, five minutes work ?
    > >
    > > Also, no driver lives alone: one often needs applications, and it's
    > > nice to have both projects under the same IDE workspace so that if
    > > nothing else they can share include files and the like.
    > > And if you really want to pig out, you can write a ten-line script
    > > that runs build.exe to build your driver but the full IDE build to
    > > make the app, link it to your build button, again, done.
    > >
    > > Use the IDE, dude.
    > >
    > > Alberto.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ----- Original Message -----
    > > From: "Gary G. Little" <[email protected]>
    > > Newsgroups: ntdev
    > > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > > <[email protected]>
    > > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:18 AM
    > > Subject: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.
    > >
    > >
    > > > Instead of wasting time mucking around with the IDE, spend
    > > your time
    > > > developing your driver code. Get DDKBUILD either from
    > > > www.hollistech.com or www.osronline.com and use the IDE
    > to create a
    > > > MAKEFILE project. That will work across any version of
    > > Visual Studio
    > > > including the 2005 beta 2.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > The personal opinion of
    > > > Gary G. Little
    > > >
    > > > "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > >> Hi,
    > > >>
    > > >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading
    > > >> Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows
    > Driver Model,
    > > >> Ed2" and now I?d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0
    > > >> (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time same error :
    > > >> error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > > Windows DDK.
    > > >> I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    > > >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for
    > > VC++6.0 and XP
    > > >> and .NET DDKs
    > > >>
    > > >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    > > also .NET,
    > > >> but wizard works only in 6.0)
    > > >>
    > > >> BR.
    > > >> Jussi
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > ---
    > > > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > > >
    > > > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected] To
    > > > unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > > ---
    > > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >
    > > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > > [email protected] To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > > [email protected]
    > >
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: unknown lmsubst tag
    > argument: ''
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > [email protected] To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
    >
  • Maxim_S._ShatskihMaxim_S._Shatskih Member Posts: 10,396
    Why people are spending this much time in building serious projects from
    IDE?
    Why not type BUILD and forget all these annoyances?

    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    [email protected]
    http://www.storagecraft.com

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Michael Becker" <[email protected]>
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List" <[email protected]>
    Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 10:19 PM
    Subject: Re: [ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.


    > Hi Jussi,
    >
    > Several months ago when I started to work with drivers I ran into a
    > similar problem. Please take all of this with a grain of salt, since
    > the details are fuzzy in my head, but the summary is that my paths were
    > incorrect / out of order when I tried to build a driver from VC6.
    >
    > First the setup, I had VC6, VS.NET, and the latest DDK installed. I was
    > trying to work on building a driver from VC6 and got a "Compiler not
    > supported" error.
    >
    > If I look at the C compiler from the 2003DDK, (just open a build
    > environment and type cl.exe), I get the following:
    > Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 13.10.2179
    >
    > If I look at the compiler from .NET, I get:
    > Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 13.10.3077
    >
    > And if I remember correctly, the compiler from VC6 is version
    > 12...something.
    >
    > So the following will fail if you use the VC6 compiler:
    >
    > #if _MSC_VER < 1300
    > #error Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK
    > #endif
    >
    >
    > When you try and build from VC6, the IDE is probably finding its
    > compiler before it finds the DDK one, thus the preprocessor check
    > fails. And it will work in .NET no matter what the paths because the
    > .NET compiler is newer than the DDK compiler.
    >
    > My solution at the time was to go back to using the Build Environment
    > shortcuts, then later integrate one of the ddkbuild utilities into an
    > IDE that I liked.
    >
    > While I'm not sure if this solves any of your problems, maybe it can
    > give you some more insight into it.
    >
    > Best Regards,
    > -Mike
    >
    >
    >
    > Jussi Rytilahti wrote:
    >
    > >Thanks all!
    > >
    > >I have already tested "ddkbuild"-tool and original "build" also.
    > >
    > >@Gary:And I like this ddkbuild and I am using it in my "training project" in
    > >.NET 2003 and it seems to work very fine.
    > >
    > >@Alberto:Your absolutelly right with this "try+success=learn" (Or something
    > >like that). I will test your way also.
    > >
    > >@PeterGV: I have tried look answer from you pages but I have not successed
    > >with this problem: Why I get this error in VC6 but not .NET and Is that
    > >possible to try this wizard in VC6 with my DDK.
    > >
    > >So, question is :can I even try this wizard? Becource .AWX it is only
    > >working in VC6, but I get that error. If I take all files which wizard has
    > >created and build them in .NET (in project which uses ddkbuild) I will
    > >succeed....Is the only way out: Create files in vc6 with wizard and then
    > >build them in .NET?
    > >
    > >Jussi
    > >
    > >"Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> kirjoitti
    > >viestissä:[email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > >>Hi,
    > >>
    > >>I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    > >>Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    > >>I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    > >>time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > >>Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation
    > >>of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs
    > >>
    > >>Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    > >>wizard works only in 6.0)
    > >>
    > >>BR.
    > >>Jussi
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >---
    > >Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >
    > >You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > >To unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Mark,

    Mark, I'm not criticizing ddkbuild! It's obviously a nice piece
    of software, because lots of people use it and are happy with
    it.

    I'm just saying that VS.NET brings in new features that make
    things easy if they're well used. And I'm also making the point
    that it is perfectly possible to use the VS.NET IDE and still do
    it so that what really happens is precisely the same that
    happens when you run from a CMD box: you set up your sources
    file, make your makefile point to makefile.def, run build.exe to
    cause compiling and linking to be done with the DDK tools.
    VS.NET ends up doing exactly the same thing we do on the command
    line, but it adds the wealth of choices and nice features of the
    IDE.

    My machine at work is an SMP and this stuff works, remember, I'm
    using build.exe and the DDK compiler and linker just like
    everyone else. I'm still running build.exe on a cmd box to cause
    the DDK compiler and linker to build my drivers, the only
    difference is that I set up VS.NET between myself and the cmd
    box so that I never have to type commands into the box: I use
    the IDE instead and if bad comes to worse I can always resort to
    the command window. VS.NET has extensive source browsing, I just
    tried it on one of my Makefile Projects and it seems to work
    fine, and I can use Whole Tomato on top of it.

    Actually, in that line, there's something I don't quite
    understand. I have looked at the C compiler versions for the
    DDKs and IDEs I have installed in my machine at home, and this
    is what I found:

    DDK 2260: CL Version 13.00.9176
    VC7 2002: CL Version 13.00.9466
    VC7 2003: CL Version 13.10.3077
    DDK 3790.1830: CL Version 13.10.4035

    I don't have VC7 2005 installed nor do I use the other DDKs, so,
    I couldn't check their compiler versions. Now, about "old
    compilers", note that DDK 2260 uses a 13.00 compiler, which I
    must believe is older than the 13.10.3077 compiler used in VC7
    2003. My naive conclusion is that anything that compiles fine
    under 13.00.9176 should compile fine under 13.10.3077, no ? Now,
    one could argue that the 13.10.4035 compiler that ships with the
    current Win2k3 SP1 DDK is newer than the VC7 2003 compiler, but
    I may bet that VC7 2005 ships with a compiler that's even newer
    than the 13.10.4035 version. Which will mean that there should
    be no problem using VS.NET 2005 to compile and link drivers.
    Unless of course Microsoft's compiler group generates special
    compilers and linkers with special features to make driver
    builds work, but do they really do that ? It doesn't quite make
    sense from a compiler writing standpoint, nor does it make much
    business sense to allow such a small target market such as
    driver writing demand special compiler features that could
    easily be avoided by taking a little bit more care in specifying
    one's APIs and libraries. But hey, anything's possible.

    In fact, I found through personal experience that the correct
    compiler/linker/lib pairing is way more important than the
    compiler level, but hey, I could be wrong because most of the
    drivers I worked with were either display/graphics/3D drivers or
    down-at-the-machine-level stuff such as BoundsChecker and
    TrueCoverage, and those aren't quite your off-the-shelf WDM
    drivers that a lot of ntdev posters write for a living.

    Last but not least, again, I'm not criticizing ddkbuild! A lot
    of people use it and they're happy with it, so, it must be a
    good tool. All I'm saying is that phrases such as "you must use
    the ddk compiler" or "if you don't use build.exe you insert
    subtle errors" are no excuse for not using the IDE. Also, I make
    a point of trying to never criticize a colleague's software, so,
    forgive me if I gave you that impression - and I apologize to
    you if that's what happened!

    Alberto.


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Mark Roddy" <[email protected]>
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    <[email protected]>
    Sent: Saturday, July 23, 2005 10:12 PM
    Subject: RE: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    Windows DDK.


    Yes of course you are right alberto. There couldn't possibly be
    anything
    else to it.

    Have you tried that on an mp machine? Ooops, error linkage in VS
    won't work.
    Have you tried to get bscmake to run so that you can use source
    browsing? It
    won't with that ddk, it will with ddkbuild which happens to know
    about the
    undocumented command line argument for turning bscmake support
    back on.
    There is a reason why ddkbuild has been out there for almost 10
    years. Is
    there some reason why you seem to think it is the wrong way to
    go?

    =====================
    Mark Roddy DDK MVP
    Windows 2003/XP/2000 Consulting
    Hollis Technology Solutions 603-321-1032
    www.hollistech.com

    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: [email protected]
    > [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Alberto
    > Moreira
    > Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 11:05 PM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: Re: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK.
    >
    > Ok, the details.
    >
    > 1. Set up an auxiliary batch file. Call it drvbuild.bat:
    >
    > call %winddk%\bin\setenv %winddk% chk wnet
    > devenv
    >
    > Of course %winddk% is your ddkroot, say, c:\winddk\3790.1830,
    > and devenv.exe's directory is in your path.
    >
    > 2. Setup a link on your desktop, for properties put something
    > like
    >
    > "%windir%\system32\cmd /k
    > %yourexecutabledirectory%\drvbuild.bat"
    >
    > Now every time you click on that icon you get an msvc.net
    > shell with all the ddk environment set up. Or, if you're
    > lazy, just bring up the checked or free cmd window of your
    > preference, type "devenv" at the prompt and press enter.
    >
    > 3. Bring up your devenv.exe. Click File/New/Project/Visual
    > C++ Projects. Choose "Makefile Project".
    >
    > 4. Set your path and project name, click "ok".
    >
    > 5. Click "Application Settings".
    >
    > 6. Enter your settings:
    >
    > 6a. Your build command line is "%windir%\bin\x86\build.
    > 6b. Your output is whatever your driver's name happens to
    > be.
    > 6c. Your clean commands are whatever you need to wipe out
    > your obj files.
    > 6d. Your rebuild command line is
    > "%windir%\bin\x86\build -c"
    >
    > Note that if you just leave these fields blank you can set
    > them in your Project/Properties window, which allows you to
    > enter multiple lines for each command: you can add debugging
    > information and other stuff if you feel like.
    >
    > 7. Now your project's up. Go Tools/Options/Projects/VC++
    > Directories and add your %windir%\bin\x86 directory to the
    > top of the executable list. That will make sure you use the
    > DDK compiler and linker when you build. If you're
    > supersticious, also add %windir%\bin to the executable list.
    >
    > 8. Now go Project/Properties and tweak your settings. Don't
    > forget to set them up for the Release build too. Also set
    > your debugging so that if you press F5 or F10, the debugger
    > goes directly to the top of your app (which, of course, you
    > will have set up as another project inside the same
    > solution!) Also, at this time you will want to add your own
    > include and lib directories to the
    > tools/options/projects/VC++ Directories lists.
    >
    > 9. Add your source files to your project as you need them.
    > Add your "sources" file to it too, you may need to tweak it
    > here or there. Also, consider splitting parts of your driver
    > into a DRIVER_LIBRARY component, it often helps.
    >
    > 10. Now your environment is ready to be tested! Click on your
    > "build sys" or "build solution" button, and you will get the
    > IDE to build your driver using your sources, your
    > makefile/makefile.inc as you feel fit, using build.exe and
    > the ddk compiler and linker.
    >
    > There's a zillion variations around this theme, and you can
    > set yourself up with other kinds of projects too, but this
    > one is very, very easy: it takes about five to ten minutes
    > work to set yourself up.
    >
    > I have also done this on occasion: build the driver once with
    > build.exe, fish out the log, pull out the command line into a
    > file, and get the shell to use the file as the source of its
    > command line switches and variables to the C++ compiler. Or
    > you can set up an utility project, that works too.
    >
    > I also call your attention to what I call the "asterisk
    > notation" property of your sources file, where you can have
    > build.exe automatically insert your architecture string (such
    > as "i386", "amd64", etc.) in your directory and/or file names.
    > Comes in handy at times!
    >
    > Alberto.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Mark Roddy" <[email protected]>
    > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > <[email protected]>
    > Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 7:41 AM
    > Subject: RE: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK.
    >
    >
    > Invoking build.exe directly is insufficient as build.exe
    > depends on the environment set up by the setenv.bat script
    > that comes with the ddk. That script in turn requires
    > specific command line arguments. The appropriate command line
    > arguments to setenv.bat change from release to release. The
    > '10 line shell script', done correctly is more like 100-200
    > lines.
    > Thus the
    > venerable ddkbuild.bat, which has managed to do this
    > correctly (more or less, your mileage may vary) since 1996.
    >
    > =====================
    > Mark Roddy DDK MVP
    > Windows 2003/XP/2000 Consulting
    > Hollis Technology Solutions 603-321-1032 www.hollistech.com
    >
    > > -----Original Message-----
    > > From: [email protected]
    > > [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of
    > Alberto Moreira
    > > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:47 PM
    > > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > > Subject: Re: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    > Windows DDK.
    > >
    > > With all due respect to Hollistech and to OSR, you need zero
    > > third
    > > party software here.
    > >
    > > Point your IDE to the DDK compiler, setup a project for
    > your driver -
    > > the settings are irrelevant - setup a custom build step
    > that invokes
    > > build.exe (or set it up so that you can reach it from
    > tools/external
    > > tools, or if you're really fastidious set up a build button
    > > on a
    > > toolbar), and setup an icon on your desktop to run
    > > DEVENV.EXE from
    > > inside a checked or free build cmd
    > > prompt: done. Takes what, five minutes work ?
    > >
    > > Also, no driver lives alone: one often needs applications,
    > > and it's
    > > nice to have both projects under the same IDE workspace so
    > > that if
    > > nothing else they can share include files and the like.
    > > And if you really want to pig out, you can write a ten-line
    > > script
    > > that runs build.exe to build your driver but the full IDE
    > > build to
    > > make the app, link it to your build button, again, done.
    > >
    > > Use the IDE, dude.
    > >
    > > Alberto.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ----- Original Message -----
    > > From: "Gary G. Little" <[email protected]>
    > > Newsgroups: ntdev
    > > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > > <[email protected]>
    > > Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 10:18 AM
    > > Subject: Re:[ntdev] Compiler version not supported by
    > > Windows DDK.
    > >
    > >
    > > > Instead of wasting time mucking around with the IDE, spend
    > > your time
    > > > developing your driver code. Get DDKBUILD either from
    > > > www.hollistech.com or www.osronline.com and use the IDE
    > to create a
    > > > MAKEFILE project. That will work across any version of
    > > Visual Studio
    > > > including the 2005 beta 2.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > The personal opinion of
    > > > Gary G. Little
    > > >
    > > > "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > >> Hi,
    > > >>
    > > >> I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am
    > > >> reading
    > > >> Walter Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows
    > Driver Model,
    > > >> Ed2" and now I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++
    > > >> 6.0
    > > >> (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every time same error :
    > > >> error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    > > Windows DDK.
    > > >> I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    > > >> Documentation of this wizard says that wizard is for
    > > VC++6.0 and XP
    > > >> and .NET DDKs
    > > >>
    > > >> Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    > > also .NET,
    > > >> but wizard works only in 6.0)
    > > >>
    > > >> BR.
    > > >> Jussi
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > ---
    > > > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > > >
    > > > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > > > [email protected] To
    > > > unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > > > [email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > > ---
    > > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >
    > > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > > [email protected] To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > > [email protected]
    > >
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: unknown lmsubst tag
    > argument: ''
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > [email protected] To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
    >



    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: unknown lmsubst tag
    argument: ''
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    [email protected]
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Takes longer than clicking on the build button. :-)

    Alberto.


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Maxim S. Shatskih" <[email protected]>
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    <[email protected]>
    Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2005 11:29 AM
    Subject: Re: [ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows
    DDK.


    > Why people are spending this much time in building serious
    > projects from
    > IDE?
    > Why not type BUILD and forget all these annoyances?
    >
    > Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    > StorageCraft Corporation
    > [email protected]
    > http://www.storagecraft.com
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Michael Becker" <[email protected]>
    > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > <[email protected]>
    > Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 10:19 PM
    > Subject: Re: [ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows
    > DDK.
    >
    >
    >> Hi Jussi,
    >>
    >> Several months ago when I started to work with drivers I ran
    >> into a
    >> similar problem. Please take all of this with a grain of
    >> salt, since
    >> the details are fuzzy in my head, but the summary is that my
    >> paths were
    >> incorrect / out of order when I tried to build a driver from
    >> VC6.
    >>
    >> First the setup, I had VC6, VS.NET, and the latest DDK
    >> installed. I was
    >> trying to work on building a driver from VC6 and got a
    >> "Compiler not
    >> supported" error.
    >>
    >> If I look at the C compiler from the 2003DDK, (just open a
    >> build
    >> environment and type cl.exe), I get the following:
    >> Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version
    >> 13.10.2179
    >>
    >> If I look at the compiler from .NET, I get:
    >> Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version
    >> 13.10.3077
    >>
    >> And if I remember correctly, the compiler from VC6 is version
    >> 12...something.
    >>
    >> So the following will fail if you use the VC6 compiler:
    >>
    >> #if _MSC_VER < 1300
    >> #error Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK
    >> #endif
    >>
    >>
    >> When you try and build from VC6, the IDE is probably finding
    >> its
    >> compiler before it finds the DDK one, thus the preprocessor
    >> check
    >> fails. And it will work in .NET no matter what the paths
    >> because the
    >> .NET compiler is newer than the DDK compiler.
    >>
    >> My solution at the time was to go back to using the Build
    >> Environment
    >> shortcuts, then later integrate one of the ddkbuild utilities
    >> into an
    >> IDE that I liked.
    >>
    >> While I'm not sure if this solves any of your problems, maybe
    >> it can
    >> give you some more insight into it.
    >>
    >> Best Regards,
    >> -Mike
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Jussi Rytilahti wrote:
    >>
    >> >Thanks all!
    >> >
    >> >I have already tested "ddkbuild"-tool and original "build"
    >> >also.
    >> >
    >> >@Gary:And I like this ddkbuild and I am using it in my
    >> >"training project" in
    >> >.NET 2003 and it seems to work very fine.
    >> >
    >> >@Alberto:Your absolutelly right with this
    >> >"try+success=learn" (Or something
    >> >like that). I will test your way also.
    >> >
    >> >@PeterGV: I have tried look answer from you pages but I have
    >> >not successed
    >> >with this problem: Why I get this error in VC6 but not .NET
    >> >and Is that
    >> >possible to try this wizard in VC6 with my DDK.
    >> >
    >> >So, question is :can I even try this wizard? Becource .AWX
    >> >it is only
    >> >working in VC6, but I get that error. If I take all files
    >> >which wizard has
    >> >created and build them in .NET (in project which uses
    >> >ddkbuild) I will
    >> >succeed....Is the only way out: Create files in vc6 with
    >> >wizard and then
    >> >build them in .NET?
    >> >
    >> >Jussi
    >> >
    >> >"Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> kirjoitti
    >> >viestissä:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >>Hi,
    >> >>
    >> >>I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am
    >> >>reading Walter
    >> >>Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model,
    >> >>Ed2" and now
    >> >>I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0
    >> >>(WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    >> >>time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version
    >> >>not supported by
    >> >>Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    >> >>Documentation
    >> >>of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and
    >> >>.NET DDKs
    >> >>
    >> >>Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    >> >>also .NET, but
    >> >>wizard works only in 6.0)
    >> >>
    >> >>BR.
    >> >>Jussi
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >---
    >> >Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >> >
    >> >You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    >> >[email protected]
    >> >To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    >> >[email protected]
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >> ---
    >> Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >>
    >> You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    >> [email protected]
    >> To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    >> [email protected]
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > [email protected]
  • David_J._CraigDavid_J._Craig Member Posts: 1,885
    "Alberto Moreira" wrote in message news:[email protected]

    > Unless of course Microsoft's compiler group generates special compilers
    > and linkers with special features to make driver builds work, but do they
    > really do that ? It doesn't quite make sense from a compiler writing
    > standpoint, nor does it make much business sense to allow such a small
    > target market such as driver writing demand special compiler features that
    > could easily be avoided by taking a little bit more care in specifying
    > one's APIs and libraries. But hey, anything's possible.
    >
    Not just driver builds. The entire core OS for Windows is built with that
    compiler according to what I understood from PlugFest and others. Microsoft
    makes that compiler not for us, but for themselves so that is a completely
    different motivation than just a almost free driver kit. Since the DDK also
    includes compiler libraries, this also ensures that you are using the same
    libraries that the OS uses. It also allows them to fix bugs for the libs
    that shipped with a down-level OS's DDK.

    I used to do my own build environment to permit me to write VxDs, NT
    drivers, DOS utilities, and libraries for use by all the above. Mark's is
    much easier, but I don't have the same control. I also avoid the constant
    maintenance by using his. It works well and with the use of Visual Studio
    .NET 2003 and the batch build capability I can do a driver for the various
    CPUs and the application in both checked and free with one (or three)
    clicks. I taught a class at work in the use of DDKBUILD for doing PreFast
    and CUV in that environment. It also included using a code coverage tool
    too.
  • Maxim_S._ShatskihMaxim_S._Shatskih Member Posts: 10,396
    Well, longer only a bit, and issues with building from VS.NET takes people
    _days_ to solve.

    Building drivers from VS.NET is not supported by Microsoft. Period. The
    rest are on-the-knee made things.

    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    [email protected]
    http://www.storagecraft.com

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Alberto Moreira" <[email protected]>
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List" <[email protected]>
    Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2005 8:01 PM
    Subject: Re: [ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.


    > Takes longer than clicking on the build button. :-)
    >
    > Alberto.
    >
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Maxim S. Shatskih" <[email protected]>
    > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > <[email protected]>
    > Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2005 11:29 AM
    > Subject: Re: [ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows
    > DDK.
    >
    >
    > > Why people are spending this much time in building serious
    > > projects from
    > > IDE?
    > > Why not type BUILD and forget all these annoyances?
    > >
    > > Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    > > StorageCraft Corporation
    > > [email protected]
    > > http://www.storagecraft.com
    > >
    > > ----- Original Message -----
    > > From: "Michael Becker" <[email protected]>
    > > To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List"
    > > <[email protected]>
    > > Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 10:19 PM
    > > Subject: Re: [ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows
    > > DDK.
    > >
    > >
    > >> Hi Jussi,
    > >>
    > >> Several months ago when I started to work with drivers I ran
    > >> into a
    > >> similar problem. Please take all of this with a grain of
    > >> salt, since
    > >> the details are fuzzy in my head, but the summary is that my
    > >> paths were
    > >> incorrect / out of order when I tried to build a driver from
    > >> VC6.
    > >>
    > >> First the setup, I had VC6, VS.NET, and the latest DDK
    > >> installed. I was
    > >> trying to work on building a driver from VC6 and got a
    > >> "Compiler not
    > >> supported" error.
    > >>
    > >> If I look at the C compiler from the 2003DDK, (just open a
    > >> build
    > >> environment and type cl.exe), I get the following:
    > >> Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version
    > >> 13.10.2179
    > >>
    > >> If I look at the compiler from .NET, I get:
    > >> Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version
    > >> 13.10.3077
    > >>
    > >> And if I remember correctly, the compiler from VC6 is version
    > >> 12...something.
    > >>
    > >> So the following will fail if you use the VC6 compiler:
    > >>
    > >> #if _MSC_VER < 1300
    > >> #error Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK
    > >> #endif
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> When you try and build from VC6, the IDE is probably finding
    > >> its
    > >> compiler before it finds the DDK one, thus the preprocessor
    > >> check
    > >> fails. And it will work in .NET no matter what the paths
    > >> because the
    > >> .NET compiler is newer than the DDK compiler.
    > >>
    > >> My solution at the time was to go back to using the Build
    > >> Environment
    > >> shortcuts, then later integrate one of the ddkbuild utilities
    > >> into an
    > >> IDE that I liked.
    > >>
    > >> While I'm not sure if this solves any of your problems, maybe
    > >> it can
    > >> give you some more insight into it.
    > >>
    > >> Best Regards,
    > >> -Mike
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Jussi Rytilahti wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >Thanks all!
    > >> >
    > >> >I have already tested "ddkbuild"-tool and original "build"
    > >> >also.
    > >> >
    > >> >@Gary:And I like this ddkbuild and I am using it in my
    > >> >"training project" in
    > >> >.NET 2003 and it seems to work very fine.
    > >> >
    > >> >@Alberto:Your absolutelly right with this
    > >> >"try+success=learn" (Or something
    > >> >like that). I will test your way also.
    > >> >
    > >> >@PeterGV: I have tried look answer from you pages but I have
    > >> >not successed
    > >> >with this problem: Why I get this error in VC6 but not .NET
    > >> >and Is that
    > >> >possible to try this wizard in VC6 with my DDK.
    > >> >
    > >> >So, question is :can I even try this wizard? Becource .AWX
    > >> >it is only
    > >> >working in VC6, but I get that error. If I take all files
    > >> >which wizard has
    > >> >created and build them in .NET (in project which uses
    > >> >ddkbuild) I will
    > >> >succeed....Is the only way out: Create files in vc6 with
    > >> >wizard and then
    > >> >build them in .NET?
    > >> >
    > >> >Jussi
    > >> >
    > >> >"Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> kirjoitti
    > >> >viestissä:[email protected]
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >>Hi,
    > >> >>
    > >> >>I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am
    > >> >>reading Walter
    > >> >>Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model,
    > >> >>Ed2" and now
    > >> >>I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0
    > >> >>(WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    > >> >>time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version
    > >> >>not supported by
    > >> >>Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP.
    > >> >>Documentation
    > >> >>of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and
    > >> >>.NET DDKs
    > >> >>
    > >> >>Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have
    > >> >>also .NET, but
    > >> >>wizard works only in 6.0)
    > >> >>
    > >> >>BR.
    > >> >>Jussi
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >---
    > >> >Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >> >
    > >> >You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > >> >[email protected]
    > >> >To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > >> >[email protected]
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> ---
    > >> Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >>
    > >> You are currently subscribed to ntdev as:
    > >> [email protected]
    > >> To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > >> [email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > > ---
    > > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    > > http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    > >
    > > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
    > > [email protected]
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: [email protected]
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">





    I don't know about everyone else, but I started with the VC6 IDE
    because there was a lot of reference to it in the book, "Programming
    the Windows Driver Model", so being new I attempted to repeat what was
    done there first before venturing into uncharted waters.



    Soon after that, I found I personally prefer build.exe at a command
    line.  Sometimes I may add a button or two to an IDE which ties into
    build.exe via ddkbuild.bat, but only because I can follow what ddkbuild
    does.



    But let me emphasis the word _personally_.  IDE vs. CLI seems to be one
    of those preferences that border on a religion (like what's the correct
    way to put braces in an if statement).  I see pros and cons to both, it
    just depends on what you are more comfortable with.  What I think is
    more important than IDE / CLI is repeatability, that no matter what you
    use, you use the same thing the same way every time.



    Just my opinion,

    -Mike





    Maxim S. Shatskih wrote:
        Why people are spending this much time in building serious projects from
    IDE?
    Why not type BUILD and forget all these annoyances?

    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    [email protected]
    http://www.storagecraft.com

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Michael Becker" <[email protected]>
    To: "Windows System Software Devs Interest List" <[email protected]>
    Sent: Friday, July 22, 2005 10:19 PM
    Subject: Re: [ntdev] Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK.


    Hi Jussi,

    Several months ago when I started to work with drivers I ran into a
    similar problem. Please take all of this with a grain of salt, since
    the details are fuzzy in my head, but the summary is that my paths were
    incorrect / out of order when I tried to build a driver from VC6.

    First the setup, I had VC6, VS.NET, and the latest DDK installed. I was
    trying to work on building a driver from VC6 and got a "Compiler not
    supported" error.

    If I look at the C compiler from the 2003DDK, (just open a build
    environment and type cl.exe), I get the following:
    Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 13.10.2179

    If I look at the compiler from .NET, I get:
    Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 13.10.3077

    And if I remember correctly, the compiler from VC6 is version
    12...something.

    So the following will fail if you use the VC6 compiler:

    #if _MSC_VER < 1300
    #error Compiler version not supported by Windows DDK
    #endif


    When you try and build from VC6, the IDE is probably finding its
    compiler before it finds the DDK one, thus the preprocessor check
    fails. And it will work in .NET no matter what the paths because the
    .NET compiler is newer than the DDK compiler.

    My solution at the time was to go back to using the Build Environment
    shortcuts, then later integrate one of the ddkbuild utilities into an
    IDE that I liked.

    While I'm not sure if this solves any of your problems, maybe it can
    give you some more insight into it.

    Best Regards,
    -Mike



    Jussi Rytilahti wrote:

    Thanks all!

    I have already tested "ddkbuild"-tool and original "build" also.

    @Gary:And I like this ddkbuild and I am using it in my "training project" in
    .NET 2003 and it seems to work very fine.

    @Alberto:Your absolutelly right with this "try+success=learn" (Or something
    like that). I will test your way also.

    @PeterGV: I have tried look answer from you pages but I have not successed
    with this problem: Why I get this error in VC6 but not .NET and Is that
    possible to try this wizard in VC6 with my DDK.

    So, question is :can I even try this wizard? Becource .AWX it is only
    working in VC6, but I get that error. If I take all files which wizard has
    created and build them in .NET (in project which uses ddkbuild) I will
    succeed....Is the only way out: Create files in vc6 with wizard and then
    build them in .NET?

    Jussi

    "Jussi Rytilahti" <[email protected]> kirjoitti
    viestissä:[email protected]


    Hi,

    I am total newbie with drivers. I have one problem. I am reading Walter
    Oneys book "Programming the Microsoft Windows Driver Model, Ed2" and now
    I´d like to try his AppWizard for Visual C++ 6.0 (WDMWIZ.AWX). I get every
    time same error : error C1189: #error : Compiler version not supported by
    Windows DDK. I am using DDK 2600.1106 and working OS is XP. Documentation
    of this wizard says that wizard is for VC++6.0 and XP and .NET DDKs

    Do I have any chances to use VC++6.0 with my DDK? (I have also .NET, but
    wizard works only in 6.0)

    BR.
    Jussi






    ---
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    ---
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