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backup storage.

OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
Hi everyone,

Wondering how the backup works in SAN environment? I read that the data is
transferred at a block level to get faster backup. what I meen by that is
NOT file system level. Is that correct?

I am thinking of a similar concept for high end PCs and low end servers. By
adding SATA port for backup on the SCSI/SATA RAID host bus adapter and
connet the external SATA storage designed for backup to this SATA port.
while backing up move the data at block level. Thus, will free up the file
system and the host CPU. The user may not see that the system is slowing
down because of the backup action.

Will this work? Any idea? please make suggestions.

Thank you,
Shakeel.

Comments

  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    It is not that simple.
    When backup is done on the block level it is performed from a snapshot of the
    data to get "crash consistent" image of the volume. If the volume contains
    file system that supports journalling then this file system will recover
    volume to a consistent state when image is used to restore data. Backing up
    data that is being changed on the block level produces completly inconsistent
    image of the volume that can not be recovered by journalling.
    SAN hardware supports creating snapshots that could be used for backup but
    SCSI devices do not support such feature.

    Alexei.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: shakeel [mailto:[email protected]]
    Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2004 11:20 AM
    To: Windows File Systems Devs Interest List
    Subject: [ntfsd] backup storage.


    Hi everyone,

    Wondering how the backup works in SAN environment? I read that the data is
    transferred at a block level to get faster backup. what I meen by that is
    NOT file system level. Is that correct?

    I am thinking of a similar concept for high end PCs and low end servers. By
    adding SATA port for backup on the SCSI/SATA RAID host bus adapter and
    connet the external SATA storage designed for backup to this SATA port.
    while backing up move the data at block level. Thus, will free up the file
    system and the host CPU. The user may not see that the system is slowing
    down because of the backup action.

    Will this work? Any idea? please make suggestions.

    Thank you,
    Shakeel.



    ---
    Questions? First check the IFS FAQ at
    https://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=17

    You are currently subscribed to ntfsd as: [email protected]
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Alexei, Thank you for giving insight on to this subject.

    Suppose we work out vender specific hardware support similar to SAN
    hardware, both on the SATA port of the RAID HBA and SATA Port of the
    external SATA storage. Will it be possible to do it then?

    the words "snapshot", "journalling" went over my head. Would you please
    elaborate on that? OR please point me to source where I can educate my self
    about it.

    Thank You,
    Shakeel.

    "Alexei Jelvis" wrote in message news:[email protected]
    It is not that simple.
    When backup is done on the block level it is performed from a snapshot of
    the
    data to get "crash consistent" image of the volume. If the volume contains
    file system that supports journalling then this file system will recover
    volume to a consistent state when image is used to restore data. Backing up
    data that is being changed on the block level produces completly
    inconsistent
    image of the volume that can not be recovered by journalling.
    SAN hardware supports creating snapshots that could be used for backup but
    SCSI devices do not support such feature.

    Alexei.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: shakeel [mailto:[email protected]]
    Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2004 11:20 AM
    To: Windows File Systems Devs Interest List
    Subject: [ntfsd] backup storage.


    Hi everyone,

    Wondering how the backup works in SAN environment? I read that the data is
    transferred at a block level to get faster backup. what I meen by that is
    NOT file system level. Is that correct?

    I am thinking of a similar concept for high end PCs and low end servers. By
    adding SATA port for backup on the SCSI/SATA RAID host bus adapter and
    connet the external SATA storage designed for backup to this SATA port.
    while backing up move the data at block level. Thus, will free up the file
    system and the host CPU. The user may not see that the system is slowing
    down because of the backup action.

    Will this work? Any idea? please make suggestions.

    Thank you,
    Shakeel.



    ---
    Questions? First check the IFS FAQ at
    https://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=17

    You are currently subscribed to ntfsd as: [email protected]
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to [email protected]
  • JohnEvansJohnEvans Member Posts: 1

    Once you have your VMware virtual infrastructure in place, the issue of your data protection would hardly leave the scene with VM backup as its primary element. You can rely on ESXi backup solutions to perform consistent image-based backups of VMware VMs.

  • Scott_Noone_(OSR)Scott_Noone_(OSR) Administrator Posts: 3,352

    ? Last post to this thread was 16 years ago...

    -scott
    OSR

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