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Editor?

David_J._CraigDavid_J._Craig Member Posts: 1,885
I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with the
most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I have
heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the best
pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows 95
to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring up
syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I can
use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which source
files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles, but I
much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief emulation
is mandatory.

Comments

  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Well, the only editor for real programmers is, of course, emacs. It more
    then an editor, it's a way of life.

    You might also look at source insight.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: David J. Craig [mailto:xxxxx@yoshimuni.com]
    Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 7:09 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: [ntdev] Editor?

    I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with the
    most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I have
    heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the best
    pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
    programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows 95
    to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring up
    syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I can
    use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
    2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which source
    files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles, but I
    much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief emulation
    is mandatory.



    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

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  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    I use the MS IDE in Visual Studio and it has GREAT Brief emulation. I also
    have a DOS and OS/2 copy of Brief lying around for those times I MUST do
    something in DOS.

    For many years I used Visual Slick Edit and it is a great product. I tried
    CW, but could not get use to it. If you plan to develop in the MS
    environment and use MS platforms, I recommend the MS IDE editor(s).

    My .1929565342 worth

    Jamey


    -----Original Message-----
    From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    [mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] On Behalf Of David J. Craig
    Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 7:09 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: [ntdev] Editor?

    I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with the
    most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I have
    heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the best
    pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
    programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows 95
    to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring up
    syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I can
    use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
    2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which source
    files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles, but I
    much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief emulation
    is mandatory.



    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@storagecraft.com
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com
  • Prokash_Sinha-1Prokash_Sinha-1 Member - All Emails Posts: 1,214
    Excluding Visual Studio..., so it seems like U are looking for something
    else...

    Current trend, seems to me, is not just project mangement, but also
    component managment, if you happen to be interested
    in that ( ie. first just the editor, second manage project ( sort of targets
    to be built), third workspace, forth component management ). Visual studio
    is coming up with that, as someone pointed it out few wks ago, different
    targets
    from the same workspace.

    So if you have component managment as well, then it is bit difficult to
    choose from, at this point in time. For example,
    eCos has a nice component manager, also win ce platform builder has a great
    one. IBM's Visual Age is another one, and this one particularly have many
    device support plug-in(s). But Visual age might not support native ASM
    coding, not sure. It handles only Java/C/C++, also not sure if it handles
    Brief compatibility, but I would guess probably yes. For example, I want to
    write some infrastructure code that should work on Palm, as well as wince, I
    would take a serious look at this IBM visual age. I did use it for
    prototyping ...

    If you are interested in one user interface, but many computing/developing
    environment (windows/Palm/Linux/Symbian/Rim )Code Warrior seems to win. Dont
    know if the editor has brief compatibilty, again there is a free download
    try. For Linux env. I did not like it, but bit better than others available.
    There is no concept of MDI, as far as I know.

    If you are looking for just Windows/DOS environment, I dont see any reason
    not to use Visual Studio, still lot of interfaces are common between 16bit
    and 32 bit, and there is no need to use the "programmers work bench" of
    MASM.

    -pro

    -----Original Message-----
    From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    [mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com]On Behalf Of Jamey Kirby
    Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 12:52 AM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?


    I use the MS IDE in Visual Studio and it has GREAT Brief emulation. I also
    have a DOS and OS/2 copy of Brief lying around for those times I MUST do
    something in DOS.

    For many years I used Visual Slick Edit and it is a great product. I tried
    CW, but could not get use to it. If you plan to develop in the MS
    environment and use MS platforms, I recommend the MS IDE editor(s).

    My .1929565342 worth

    Jamey


    -----Original Message-----
    From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    [mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] On Behalf Of David J. Craig
    Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 7:09 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: [ntdev] Editor?

    I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with the
    most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I have
    heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the best
    pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
    programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows 95
    to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring up
    syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I can
    use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
    2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which source
    files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles, but I
    much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief emulation
    is mandatory.



    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@storagecraft.com
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com


    ---
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  • Maxim_S._ShatskihMaxim_S._Shatskih Member Posts: 10,396
    > So if you have component managment as well, then it is bit difficult to
    > choose from, at this point in time. For example,
    > eCos has a nice component manager, also win ce platform builder has a great
    > one.

    Sorry.

    I prefer component management to be done by editing the SOURCES-like file
    manually. There is no need in any GUI in this - and any GUI in this is just
    illusion of usability for dummies.

    Windows core OS uses SOURCES, Linux uses makefiles (the similar approach),
    other UNIXen also go this way - then why have the clumsy memory-heavy IDE to do
    the things which can be done in NOTEPAD?

    Let's look at WinCE PB. While building the platform, it spends around 10
    minutes (on dual Pentium III) at sysgen phase, even without compiling/linking
    anything. Sorry, but what occurs at this phase? I expect this is some lag
    introduced by the component management approach in it.

    The value of MSVC++/Visual Studio IDEs are only 2:
    - good text editor
    - wizards which generate the code "bones" for MFC/ATL etc.

    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    xxxxx@storagecraft.com
    http://www.storagecraft.com
  • Prokash_Sinha-1Prokash_Sinha-1 Member - All Emails Posts: 1,214
    Nothing tobe sorry 'bout, you do have a valid point, as usual. I happen to
    be involved in an embedded project partly when Wince was at 1.x version, HP
    was doing some cool stuff. At that time, there was no platform builder, and
    having to configure the OS (OAL layers mostly) by tweaking makefile(s) was a
    royal pain in the *ss. There was no BSP package(s) or hardly any vendors out
    there for BSP packages, so all was very raw. Platform builder and such
    helps, but as you said, whenever there is a hiccup, we all needs to digdown,
    and editing SOURCES or makefile is only recourse to solve those. As an
    example, think about how many apps are built using MFC (since 16 bits), I
    imagine a lot, a whole lot. But if someone needs to understand, or in case
    of a serious problem, one has to dig down deep, and at that stage, C or even
    asm is the only recourse, same idea, kick start with some dummy boilerplate
    code then start digging as needed.

    For example, when I code on Linux, or build new kernel patch or new version,
    if I want to look at the source, my finger types " vi some source" or vi !.
    Even people thinks emacs is old, so vi must be ancient, but just got so used
    to it, never quite got out of it. So it all depends, how one look at it. I
    personally like component management, specially when a clicking takes
    networking module out of my build, for example, but there is an imminent
    danger, if anything goes wrong, there is an extra element one needs to
    learn, that is that, learn the engine's working behind the component
    manager.

    Personally, I would be really happy if I dont have to look outside windows
    development, even more outside dos environement, then I would not need to
    worry about multi-process, multi-thread, real-mode direct hardware access,
    use a brief like editor, and hex editor, everything is much much simpler,
    but situation(s) demands to look outside the windows, and that's where I go
    for speed, and obviously some dummy approaches, otherwise, my mind would
    completely blow-up due to distraction(s) on the way ...

    -pro


    -----Original Message-----
    From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    [mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com]On Behalf Of Maxim S. Shatskih
    Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 11:22 AM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: Re: [ntdev] Editor?


    > So if you have component managment as well, then it is bit difficult to
    > choose from, at this point in time. For example,
    > eCos has a nice component manager, also win ce platform builder has a
    great
    > one.

    Sorry.

    I prefer component management to be done by editing the SOURCES-like file
    manually. There is no need in any GUI in this - and any GUI in this is just
    illusion of usability for dummies.

    Windows core OS uses SOURCES, Linux uses makefiles (the similar approach),
    other UNIXen also go this way - then why have the clumsy memory-heavy IDE to
    do
    the things which can be done in NOTEPAD?

    Let's look at WinCE PB. While building the platform, it spends around 10
    minutes (on dual Pentium III) at sysgen phase, even without
    compiling/linking
    anything. Sorry, but what occurs at this phase? I expect this is some lag
    introduced by the component management approach in it.

    The value of MSVC++/Visual Studio IDEs are only 2:
    - good text editor
    - wizards which generate the code "bones" for MFC/ATL etc.

    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    xxxxx@storagecraft.com
    http://www.storagecraft.com


    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@garlic.com
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Okay, I couldn't keep quiet anymore about my editor of choice. I've been
    using Epsilon from Lugaru (http://www.lugaru.com) for 13+ years. They have
    versions for DOS, OS/2, Windows, and many Unix platforms and most (if not
    all) versions come in the same package with one license. It's an Emacs-like
    editor and has been around for 17+ years. There is an extensible
    programming language that lets you modify it's behavior in almost any
    fashion you can think of and a large user community who develop (and give
    away) their extensions. It has everything to meet my needs and is a
    relatively simple yet elegant editor. I've tried other ones over the years,
    but I always come back after a day (or half-day.)

    Paul

    -----Original Message-----
    From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    [mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] On Behalf Of Prokash Sinha
    Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 2:51 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?

    Nothing tobe sorry 'bout, you do have a valid point, as usual. I happen to
    be involved in an embedded project partly when Wince was at 1.x version, HP
    was doing some cool stuff. At that time, there was no platform builder, and
    having to configure the OS (OAL layers mostly) by tweaking makefile(s) was a
    royal pain in the *ss. There was no BSP package(s) or hardly any vendors out
    there for BSP packages, so all was very raw. Platform builder and such
    helps, but as you said, whenever there is a hiccup, we all needs to digdown,
    and editing SOURCES or makefile is only recourse to solve those. As an
    example, think about how many apps are built using MFC (since 16 bits), I
    imagine a lot, a whole lot. But if someone needs to understand, or in case
    of a serious problem, one has to dig down deep, and at that stage, C or even
    asm is the only recourse, same idea, kick start with some dummy boilerplate
    code then start digging as needed.

    For example, when I code on Linux, or build new kernel patch or new version,
    if I want to look at the source, my finger types " vi some source" or vi !.
    Even people thinks emacs is old, so vi must be ancient, but just got so used
    to it, never quite got out of it. So it all depends, how one look at it. I
    personally like component management, specially when a clicking takes
    networking module out of my build, for example, but there is an imminent
    danger, if anything goes wrong, there is an extra element one needs to
    learn, that is that, learn the engine's working behind the component
    manager.

    Personally, I would be really happy if I dont have to look outside windows
    development, even more outside dos environement, then I would not need to
    worry about multi-process, multi-thread, real-mode direct hardware access,
    use a brief like editor, and hex editor, everything is much much simpler,
    but situation(s) demands to look outside the windows, and that's where I go
    for speed, and obviously some dummy approaches, otherwise, my mind would
    completely blow-up due to distraction(s) on the way ...

    -pro


    -----Original Message-----
    From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    [mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com]On Behalf Of Maxim S. Shatskih
    Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 11:22 AM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: Re: [ntdev] Editor?


    > So if you have component managment as well, then it is bit difficult to
    > choose from, at this point in time. For example,
    > eCos has a nice component manager, also win ce platform builder has a
    great
    > one.

    Sorry.

    I prefer component management to be done by editing the SOURCES-like file
    manually. There is no need in any GUI in this - and any GUI in this is just
    illusion of usability for dummies.

    Windows core OS uses SOURCES, Linux uses makefiles (the similar approach),
    other UNIXen also go this way - then why have the clumsy memory-heavy IDE to
    do
    the things which can be done in NOTEPAD?

    Let's look at WinCE PB. While building the platform, it spends around 10
    minutes (on dual Pentium III) at sysgen phase, even without
    compiling/linking
    anything. Sorry, but what occurs at this phase? I expect this is some lag
    introduced by the component management approach in it.

    The value of MSVC++/Visual Studio IDEs are only 2:
    - good text editor
    - wizards which generate the code "bones" for MFC/ATL etc.

    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    xxxxx@storagecraft.com
    http://www.storagecraft.com


    ---
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    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

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  • Gary_G._LittleGary_G._Little Member Posts: 508
    Visual Studio's IDE, .NET current incarnation. (Enterprise Architect if you
    can)

    --
    Gary G. Little
    Seagate Technologies, LLC

    "David J. Craig" wrote in message
    news:xxxxx@ntdev...
    > I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    > CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with the
    > most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I have
    > heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the best
    > pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
    > programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows 95
    > to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring up
    > syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I can
    > use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
    > 2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which source
    > files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles, but I
    > much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief emulation
    > is mandatory.
    >
    >
    >
  • David_J._CraigDavid_J._Craig Member Posts: 1,885
    Gary, Brief emulation is mandatory. MS dropped it from .NET 2003. I
    also don't like some of the major changes that occur with each major
    release. It is a hog too, but I do use it for all my GUI programming,
    including system utilities that use the DDK header files.

    "Gary G. Little" wrote in message
    news:xxxxx@ntdev...
    > Visual Studio's IDE, .NET current incarnation. (Enterprise Architect
    if you
    > can)
    >
    > --
    > Gary G. Little
    > Seagate Technologies, LLC
    >
    > "David J. Craig" wrote in message
    > news:xxxxx@ntdev...
    > > I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    > > CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with
    the
    > > most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I
    have
    > > heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the
    best
    > > pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
    > > programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows
    95
    > > to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring
    up
    > > syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I
    can
    > > use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
    > > 2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which
    source
    > > files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles,
    but I
    > > much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief
    emulation
    > > is mandatory.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Actually, believe it or not, I'll vote for MSVC 6. Or, if you want to use a
    manly editor, I'd say Emacs.

    Alberto.


    -----Original Message-----
    From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    [mailto:xxxxx@lists.osr.com]On Behalf Of David J. Craig
    Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2004 10:09 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: [ntdev] Editor?


    I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with the
    most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I have
    heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the best
    pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
    programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows 95
    to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring up
    syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I can
    use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
    2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which source
    files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles, but I
    much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief emulation
    is mandatory.



    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@compuware.com
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com



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  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: David J. Craig [mailto:xxxxx@yoshimuni.com]
    > Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 10:52 AM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: Re:[ntdev] Editor?
    >
    > Gary, Brief emulation is mandatory. MS dropped it from .NET
    > 2003. I also don't like some of the major changes that occur
    > with each major release. It is a hog too, but I do use it
    > for all my GUI programming, including system utilities that
    > use the DDK header files.
    >

    Well that's the problem in a nutshell. You can hate VS, but it is really
    hard to get away from. So then the question becomes 'do you really want to
    have to use two different program editors and programming environments?'
    Even though I used to be an emacs bigot, I've ended up just putting up with
    VS in all of its incarnations, and learning how to make everything look like
    a VS project.

    Whatever you think of the merits or lack thereof of integrating the ddk
    build system with VS, not having to constantly change program editing models
    works for me.



    =====================
    Mark Roddy
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    I'm a Brief guy too. I use Visual Slickedit. One of my favorite things is
    the ability to customize the key mappings and menus. I have a popup menu to
    insert comments with my initials and a date/time stamp, for instance. I
    turn off most of the toolbars to maximize viewable code area. I do driver
    builds, including secondary processing like Lint or PREFast, directly within
    VSE. I simply wrote a batch file to call SETENV and BUILD with the desired
    parameters and environment variables in place. Double clicking on errors to
    jump to offending source is right there. VSE is sweet stuff.

    Chris Myers


    >-----Original Message-----
    >From: David J. Craig [mailto:xxxxx@yoshimuni.com]
    >Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 10:52 AM
    >To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    >Subject: Re:[ntdev] Editor?
    >
    >
    >Gary, Brief emulation is mandatory. MS dropped it from .NET
    >2003. I also don't like some of the major changes that occur
    >with each major release. It is a hog too, but I do use it for
    >all my GUI programming, including system utilities that use
    >the DDK header files.
    >
    >"Gary G. Little" wrote in message
    >news:xxxxx@ntdev...
    >> Visual Studio's IDE, .NET current incarnation. (Enterprise Architect
    >if you
    >> can)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Gary G. Little
    >> Seagate Technologies, LLC
    >>
    >> "David J. Craig" wrote in message
    >> news:xxxxx@ntdev...
    >> > I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    >> > CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly.
    >The one with
    >the
    >> > most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I
    >have
    >> > heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the
    >best
    >> > pricing with a competitive product offer. I use
    >CodeWright to build
    >> > programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows
    >95
    >> > to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring
    >up
    >> > syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I
    >can
    >> > use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs
    >for VS .NET
    >> > 2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which
    >source
    >> > files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles,
    >but I
    >> > much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief
    >emulation
    >> > is mandatory.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    >---
    >Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    >http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    >You are currently
    >subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@quatech.com To unsubscribe
    >send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    >
  • Bill_McKenzie-2Bill_McKenzie-2 Member Posts: 211
    Ditto

    --
    Bill McKenzie
    Software Engineer - Prism 802.11 Wireless Solutions
    Conexant Systems, Inc.


    "Roddy, Mark" wrote in message news:xxxxx@ntdev...
    > > -----Original Message-----
    > > From: David J. Craig [mailto:xxxxx@yoshimuni.com]
    > > Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 10:52 AM
    > > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > > Subject: Re:[ntdev] Editor?
    > >
    > > Gary, Brief emulation is mandatory. MS dropped it from .NET
    > > 2003. I also don't like some of the major changes that occur
    > > with each major release. It is a hog too, but I do use it
    > > for all my GUI programming, including system utilities that
    > > use the DDK header files.
    > >
    >
    > Well that's the problem in a nutshell. You can hate VS, but it is really
    > hard to get away from. So then the question becomes 'do you really want to
    > have to use two different program editors and programming environments?'
    > Even though I used to be an emacs bigot, I've ended up just putting up
    with
    > VS in all of its incarnations, and learning how to make everything look
    like
    > a VS project.
    >
    > Whatever you think of the merits or lack thereof of integrating the ddk
    > build system with VS, not having to constantly change program editing
    models
    > works for me.
    >
    >
    >
    > =====================
    > Mark Roddy
    >
    >
  • Michal_Vodicka-1Michal_Vodicka-1 Member Posts: 715
    Just a note about Multi-Edit and Brief support. It was added long years before when Brief was the only real competitor. Currently I'm affraid only few people use it and there can be problems. I heard about some with single window mode which, if I understand correctly, emulates Brief window look. If you're considering it, download demo and try if it fulfils your needs. Editor choice is probably the most important one (although people using VS or notepad don't see it :) and preferences differ.

    Best regards,

    Michal Vodicka
    UPEK, Inc.
    [xxxxx@upek.com, http:://www.upek.com]

    > ----------
    > From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com[SMTP:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] on behalf of David J. Craig[SMTP:xxxxx@yoshimuni.com]
    > Reply To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2004 4:08 AM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: [ntdev] Editor?
    >
    > I am going for a vote for programming editor. I have been using
    > CodeWright, but Borland is killing it - albeit slowly. The one with the
    > most votes, excluding Visual Studio, will be the first I try. I have
    > heard of MultiEdit and SlickEdit. SlickEdit appears to have the best
    > pricing with a competitive product offer. I use CodeWright to build
    > programs with Visual C++ 1.52c, MASM, and all the DDKs from Windows 95
    > to Windows Server 2003 having it start the batch compile and bring up
    > syntax errors automatically. It also has a nice feature so that I can
    > use it instead of Visual Studio for editing GUI programs for VS .NET
    > 2003 and 6.0 as it can use the MS project files to control which source
    > files belong. I still switch back to VS to initiate the compiles, but I
    > much prefer the editing interface - it supports Brief. Brief emulation
    > is mandatory.
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256
    >
    > You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@upek.com
    > To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com
    >
  • Michal_Vodicka-1Michal_Vodicka-1 Member Posts: 715
    > ----------
    > From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com[SMTP:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] on behalf of Roddy, Mark[SMTP:xxxxx@stratus.com]
    > Reply To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 11:18 PM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?
    >
    > Well that's the problem in a nutshell. You can hate VS, but it is really
    > hard to get away from.
    >
    Why? For application developer who designs user interfaces, maybe. But for driver developer? Every good programmers editor can be configured to start a batch for driver or application build, capture output and find errors. VS integrated debugger has no use in kernel mode and kernel debugger can be used also for user mode debugging (I use SoftICE for everything).

    P.S. I apologize for HTML mails. Our new mailserver is misconfigured (wrong default); it should be fixed soon.

    Best regards,

    Michal Vodicka
    STMicroelectronics Design and Application s.r.o.
    [michal.vodicka@st.com, http:://www.st.com]
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    The auto completion and source browsing are the great features.

    Regards,
    Calvin

    -
    Calvin Guan Software Engineer
    ATI Technologies Inc. www.ati.com

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Michal Vodicka [mailto:xxxxx@veridicom.cz.nospam]
    Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 3:11 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?



    ----------
    From:
    xxxxx@lists.osr.com[SMTP:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] on
    behalf of Roddy, Mark[SMTP:xxxxx@stratus.com]

    Reply To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 11:18 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?

    Well that's the problem in a nutshell. You can hate VS, but it is
    really
    hard to get away from.

    Why? For application developer who designs user interfaces, maybe. But for
    driver developer? Every good programmers editor can be configured to start a
    batch for driver or application build, capture output and find errors. VS
    integrated debugger has no use in kernel mode and kernel debugger can be
    used also for user mode debugging (I use SoftICE for everything).

    P.S. I apologize for HTML mails. Our new mailserver is misconfigured (wrong
    default); it should be fixed soon.

    Best regards,

    Michal Vodicka
    STMicroelectronics Design and Application s.r.o.
    [michal.vodicka@st.com, http:://www.st.com]

    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@ati.com
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com
  • OSR_Community_UserOSR_Community_User Member Posts: 110,217
    Why? Because I frequently build related applications and drivers. If you
    don't, if your test apps are all command line stuff, if you have no user
    interface requirements that go beyond a command line, then indeed any editor
    will do. Otherwise see my previous comments.

    (Perhaps you could forward your mail to me and I will de-htmlize it for you
    :-)



    =====================
    Mark Roddy





    ________________________________

    From: Michal Vodicka [mailto:xxxxx@veridicom.cz.nospam]
    Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 3:11 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?



    ----------
    From:
    xxxxx@lists.osr.com[SMTP:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] on
    behalf of Roddy, Mark[SMTP:xxxxx@stratus.com]

    Reply To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 11:18 PM
    To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?

    Well that's the problem in a nutshell. You can hate VS, but
    it is really
    hard to get away from.

    Why? For application developer who designs user interfaces, maybe.
    But for driver developer? Every good programmers editor can be configured to
    start a batch for driver or application build, capture output and find
    errors. VS integrated debugger has no use in kernel mode and kernel debugger
    can be used also for user mode debugging (I use SoftICE for everything).

    P.S. I apologize for HTML mails. Our new mailserver is misconfigured
    (wrong default); it should be fixed soon.

    Best regards,

    Michal Vodicka
    STMicroelectronics Design and Application s.r.o.
    [michal.vodicka@st.com, http:://www.st.com]

    ---
    Questions? First check the Kernel Driver FAQ at
    http://www.osronline.com/article.cfm?id=256

    You are currently subscribed to ntdev as: xxxxx@stratus.com
    To unsubscribe send a blank email to xxxxx@lists.osr.com
  • Ed_in_CalifEd_in_Calif Member Posts: 14
    Has anyone tried UltraEdit?
  • Michal_Vodicka-1Michal_Vodicka-1 Member Posts: 715
    > ----------
    > From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com[SMTP:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] on behalf of Roddy, Mark[SMTP:xxxxx@stratus.com]
    > Reply To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 9:28 PM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?
    >
    > Why? Because I frequently build related applications and drivers. If you
    > don't, if your test apps are all command line stuff, if you have no user
    > interface requirements that go beyond a command line, then indeed any editor
    > will do. Otherwise see my previous comments.
    >
    OK, I see. Yes, I prefer command line testing tools and the rest of my user mode development are DLLs and services.

    > (Perhaps you could forward your mail to me and I will de-htmlize it for you
    > :-)
    >
    :-) It would be nice if listserv has this feature.

    Best regards,

    Michal Vodicka
    UPEK, Inc.
    [xxxxx@upek.com, http:://www.upek.com]
  • Michal_Vodicka-1Michal_Vodicka-1 Member Posts: 715
    > ----------
    > From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com[SMTP:xxxxx@lists.osr.com] on behalf of Calvin Guan[SMTP:xxxxx@ati.com]
    > Reply To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 9:26 PM
    > To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List
    > Subject: RE: [ntdev] Editor?
    >
    > The auto completion and source browsing are the great features.
    >
    Yes. Other editors supported it years before the first VS version was released :-) Seriously, there can be reasons to stay with VS IDE but editor features isn't one of them (don't intend to start flamewar).

    Best regards,

    Michal Vodicka
    UPEK, Inc.
    [xxxxx@upek.com, http:://www.upek.com]
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